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It’s the View and much more

'A' circuit to trails to polo to charros, equestrians appreciate Lake View Terrace

By AUDREY PAVIA for the Horsetrader - September 18th, 2014

LAKE VIEW TERRACE — If you love California, you will appreciate Lake View Terrace. In the wintertime, the snow covered ridges of the San Gabriel Mountains stand as a backdrop. In the spring, wildflowers color the foothill slopes. On summer evenings, the smell of sage rises up from the creek beds. And in the fall, a crisp wind blows down from the hills.

Ride and Wine

Ranches, history, wineries paint Paso Robles landscape

By AUDREY PAVIA for the Horsetrader - August 21st, 2014

Vineyards and horses are part of Paso Robles past, present, and future.

Vineyards and horses are part of Paso Robles past, present, and future.

Horsetrader photo

It was 1797 when Father Junipero Serra planted more than 1,000 grapevines in the pristine hills of California’s central coast. The vineyard, adjacent to one of the Central Coast’s most beautiful missions, San Miguel Arcangel, would eventually become part of a picturesque community rich in history, viticulture, and, of course, horses.

Paso Robles, located in northern San Luis Obispo County, is home to 30,000 residents. Incorporated in 1889, the name Paso Robles comes from the Spanish El Paso de Robles, or “The Pass of the Oaks.” Situated 230 miles north of Los Angeles and 210 miles south of San Francisco, this 19.9-acre city is a haven for horse lovers.

Progress on the trail

From Horsetrader staff reports - July 17th, 2014

BONITA — Thanks to a campaign by members of a local riding group, a popular recreational trail near the Sweetwater Valley reservoir reopened June 25 after being closed for six months.

An ETI Weekend…

Trail Trials gives riders the next step to compete

Special to the Horsetrader - April 7th, 2011

PALMDALE – Equestrian Trails, Inc. may be in its 65th year, but the group’s energy is more like a young colt.

One of ETI’s most active corrals, ETI Corral #138, held a Trail Trial April 3 from the new Barrel Springs Arena in northern Los Angeles County, and 45 riders competed at the fun, well-attended event.

“Trail Trials are a fun competition on the trail that friends and family can do together,” said organizer Kimberly Dwight, adding that judging is based on safety and control in negotiation of 10 obstacles. “You’ll also learn lots about your relationship with your horse and how he responds to your cues.”

Favorite Places…

From Horsetrader staff reports - April 7th, 2011

State Parks photo

Cuyamaca Rancho State Park
San Diego County

Los Vaqueros Group Horse Camp
This group horse campground is available by reservation from mid May until mid September. You may make reservations by contacting Reserve America.

The group horse camp is located on Los Caballos road, about two miles east of Highway 79, inside Cuyamaca Rancho State Park. The park offers over 100 miles of hiking trails with pine and oak forests, meadows, streams, ocean and desert views.

LOS ANGELES – Representatives of the homegrown Los Angeles Horse Council met with Los Angeles Equine Committee members Jan. 24, reviewing the LAHC’s effort for a “Equestrian Bill of Rights.”

The Bill of Rights is the LAHC’s set of equine specific precepts for use by city and county officials that, if adopted, will set in clearer course for equestrian lifestyle in the future.

Mounting A Purpose

With municipal budgets shrinking, volunteer mounted patrols are needed more than ever

By LYNN BROWN / Special to the Horsetrader - January 6th, 2011
Bill Naylor and Sharon Chandler at a PowWow at Hart Park.

Bill Naylor and Sharon Chandler at a PowWow at Hart Park.

LOS ANGELES — In today’s economy, most of us are aware that funding for both local City Parks, County Parks and State Parks have been cut severely. Agencies are suffering for funds for maintenance, security and other routine patrol functions. For the equestrian, this is a fine opportunity to step up, help out, and polish the image of horses and equestrian contribution in both urban and rural communities.

In many Southern California cities, our western heritage and the role of the horse has been forgotten by many urban dwellers. Equestrian volunteerism works well from a public relations prospect — the horse is in the public eye, as is its importance to the rural lifestyle and also to the general public.

Drain incident leads to mare’s death and community uproar

From the Newstrader - January 6th, 2011
Bert Bonnett and Cassie before Dec. 4 streetside accident.

Bert Bonnett and Cassie before Dec. 4 streetside accident.

LOS ANGELES – A traffic-related incident that resulted in a euthanized mare and a shaken 100-year-old equestrian has galvanized the community to appeal use of storm grates termed unsafe.

On Dec. 4, a car driving on Wheatland Avenue reportedly brushed Bert Bonnett on his Tennessee Walker, Cassie, and spooked her to a curb that had been outfitted with a type of storm drain designed to prevent large debris from entering run-off. Bonnett, who was thrown into the street, survived. The mare, however, became trapped in the curbside debris screen and did not survive the ordeal despite valiant efforts by volunteers and emergency personnel, including Rene Herrera, founder of the Foothill Mounted Patrol and a city firefighter who responded.

Robin Magness
Norco, CA

I would like to be optimistic about 2011 and think that the market will bounce back like the economy. People still have dreams of horse ownership, and I think they will make it happen this year! I don’t care what breed of horse you are into, you will find it — it’s out there — and don’t let anyone sway you from what you are looking for in a horse. Happy Horse Hunting in 2011!

Dr. Sylvia Caldwell
Borrego Springs, CA

I still see a cautious horse industry. True horse-lovers will weather the bad economy, and there will always be a market for good horses — that is why we are still standing and breeding our stallion “Skip Legacy.”

Malcolm Miller
City Of Norco photo

Malcolm Miller

NORCO, CA – Memorial services were held at Nellie Weaver Hall Tuesday, Nov. 23, for Norco Mayor Malcolm Miller, who passed away Nov. 17 after battling with liver cancer that had been diagnosed in August.

Dr. Miller, 65, a retired anesthesiologist, was in his first four-year council term after being elected in 2007. His gentle, intellectual manner were combined with a drive to preserve and enjoy his community’s equestrian lifestyle. He saw his role as one who could influence long-term implications of City Council decisions – and also prevent council members’ political differences over them to become personal. Two weeks before his death, he had announced that he would take a 10-week leave of absence to receive treatment.