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One Stop Shop & Education Too

http://bit.ly/Expolist

- January 1st, 2017

All American Horses
619-572-3087
AllAmericanHorses.org
BOOTH 9218
All American Horses provides top professonal services inNatural Horsemanship, certified training, consignment horse sales and boarding. Experienced in working with all breeds and disciplines, All American Horses prides itself on its long-lasting client relationships. The saying, “Horses are our life” rings true, as All American Horses holds national and international certifications with more than 20 years of professional experience that make a difference. Your horse will know the difference! All American Horses invites all Expo Pomona attendees to visit its booth to learn of the facility’s popular boarding and training options, as well as of its tried-and-true consignment and training program, where they tune up your horse, market it and get it sold to a good home.

Lots to Learn

- January 1st, 2017

The ‘take home’ for Expo Pomona attendees will be
lessons learned up close from the best clinicians

John and Josh Lyons are among the headliners this year, as Horse Expo Pomona continues to bring top equine experts to its stages and arenas. One ticket price gets you access to unlimited learning, whether you’re a competitor looking for an edge or a recreational rider looking for insight into your human-horse relationship.

John Lyons
One of the most respected trainers around the world, John Lyons is known as “America’s Most Trusted Horseman.” He has earned that title through 30 years of dedication to horses and horse owners. His ideas and concepts in horse training have influenced every level of performance, every style of riding and every breed of horse throughout the world, and it’s safe to say that his ideas and work have changed thousands of lives. John’s sincere regard for people and the horses they love has remained unchanged throughout his career.
John has been honored by many facets of the horse industry, including universities, breed associations, horse clubs, magazines, cities and states for his contributions and dedication to the horse and the industry, and he continues to be one of the most sought-after trainers, speakers, demonstrators and clinicians anywhere. There is hardly an expo in the country or around the world where you will not find John, his children Josh, Brandi, and Michael or one of their certified trainers as a guest clinician. John and his wife Jody live and work in Parachute, Colo., on “Our Dream Ranch.” Their door is always open to everyone and you are invited to stop by anytime.

1612A CoverJANUARY-FEBRUARY

A growing number of equestrians are taking up arms, as shooting on horseback continues to attract new competitors to its ranks.
Lured by the challenge and the camaraderie, memberships are swelling in the Cowboy Mounted Shooting Association — especially in California and the birthplace of CMSA, Arizona, where the Arizona Mounted Shooters Association had three January events to start the year.
With names like Roy Rogers Rangers and the Tombstone Ghost Riders, how can anyone resist a peek at this fast-action sport that requires horsemanship — and a special horse.

Six-year-old Katherine King may not have much experience in the saddle, but you can bet she was among the nation’s leaders in ribbons won this year.
The youngster from Placentia, known in her circles as “Katherine The Brave”, lost her battle to a rare illness, Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG), but a village of supporters grew to include trainer Heather Spies and clients at HS Performance Horses in Riverside. After devoting themselves to give Katherine a special day with a unicorn via the Make A Wish Foundation, the barn dedicated itself to the youngster and her family.
“No National Championship moment, no Regional Championship or any ribbon will ever compare to that day,” said Spies, whose former horse, a retired Arabian now owned by Lori Chiodini, made the perfect unicorn.
After a courageous struggle that inspired many and raised awareness of DIPG, Katherine died in June.

FEBRUARY

Big names filled the field at HITS Therma’, including Olympic Gold Medalist and five-time World Cup finalist, Will Simpson of Westlake Village and Olympian and World Cup Finals champion Rich Fellers and Flexible, owned by Harry and Mollie Champion. It would be Los Angeles equestrian Chris Pratt, who had won over $150,000 in Week III of the HITS Desert Circuit alone, and owner Eddy Sepul’s stunning Dutch Warmblood gelding, Edesa’s Basantos, who would take home the well-deserved victory in the $350,000 HITS Thermal Grand Prix Feb. 7.

As the crowd gathered to watch the $100,000 Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping in Thermal on Feb. 13, the international line-up of horses and riders for the final West Coast qualifying opportunity — and a $100,000 prize purse – was impressive.
Egypt native Nayel Nassar, a winner of the 2013 HITS Saugerties $1 Million Grand Prix, and his own Lordan showed they were ready to compete in 2016, qualifying for the jump-off in the last go, then flying through the final round in their deceptively fast yet careful style for victory. Two weeks later, Rich Fellers and Flexible topped a strong field that included Will Simpson, Susie Hutchison and 43 others in the $25,000 Smartpak Grand Prix at HITS Thermal.
Hutchison, who had just won the $5,000 Brook Ledge Welcome two days earlier on Ziedento, tipped her hat to her victorious colleague.
“They are just on an unstoppable tear” said Hutchison, who had made the jump-off on Ziedento. “Flexible seems like he’s still 10 years old. It’s an amazing duo to watch.”

JANUARY

A growing number of equestrians are taking up arms, as shooting on horseback continues to attract new competitors to its ranks.
Lured by the challenge and the camaraderie, memberships are swelling in the Cowboy Mounted Shooting Association — especially in California and the birthplace of CMSA, Arizona, where the Arizona Mounted Shooters Association had three January events to start the year.
With names like Roy Rogers Rangers and the Tombstone Ghost Riders, how can anyone resist a peek at this fast-action sport that requires horsemanship — and a special horse.

FEBRUARY

With two big scores in four tough events, Clayton Edsall of Oakdale earned the title of World’s Greatest Horseman during the National Reined Cow Horse Association Celebration of Champions event held Feb. 12-20 at the Will Rogers Equestrian Center.

Riding his own gelding, Skeets Oak Peppy, Edsall scored a 221 to lead the herd work to set his winning pace.

Out with a bang

As Reno hosts its final NRCHA Snaffle Bit, the Futurity Finals is one for the ages

From releases and staff reports - November 3rd, 2016

1611A CoverRENO, Nev. — In its final go at the Reno Livestock Events Center, the National Reined Cow Horse Association’s Snaffle Bit Futurity played out Sept. 19-Oct. 1, and while tradition was on center stage throughout the event, so was its future.

Top riders and horses in all divisions sparked intense competition that made goosebumps and fed anticipation for next year’s Futurity at the Will Rogers Coliseum in Fort Worth, Texas.

“I heard from several people, it’s one of the best finals they’ve ever seen,” said NRCHA 2 Million Dollar Rider and Open finalist Todd Bergen of Eagle Point, Ore. “I think that just shows where this sport is going, how good it’s gotten, how good the horses are, how good the trainers are.”

Romance at the Shoot Out

- November 3rd, 2016
Aaron Brookshire and his fiancee Allyson Tapie embrace after she accepted his proposal in front of the judge's stand at the Southern California Reined Cow Horse Association Shootout on Oct. 16.

Aaron Brookshire and his fiancee Allyson Tapie embrace after she accepted his proposal in front of the judge’s stand at the Southern California Reined Cow Horse Association Shootout on Oct. 16.

Dave Tapie photo

TEMECULA — It seemed routine to Allyson Tapie, who had just completed her reining and boxing runs Sunday at the Southern California Reined Cow Horse Association Shootout in the final go of the day. Then, as she and her Little Yellow Vett started their trot out of the arena, the show manager called her to the judges stand for a bit check.

“I was confused because bit checks are not normally done before you leave the arena,” she said. “But it can be called if the judge sees a need to call one.”

On Top

California Dressage Society caps banner year with 2016 CDS and Region 7 championships

Special to the Horsetrader - October 20th, 2016
Ruth Shirkey and Wyleigh Princess were one of many champions crowned on the final day of competition at the Great American/USDF Region 7 & CDS Championship Show Sept. 29-Oct. 2 at the L.A. Equestrian Center.

Ruth Shirkey and Wyleigh Princess were one of many champions crowned on the final day of competition at the Great American/USDF Region 7 & CDS Championship Show Sept. 29-Oct. 2 at the L.A. Equestrian Center.

Terri Miller photo

BURBANK — Among the many smiling faces seen during awards ceremonies for 29 championship divisions on the final day of the 49th Annual California Dressage Society (CDS) Annual Championship Show and Great American Insurance Group/United States Dressage Federation (USDF) Region 7 Championships held Sept. 29-Oct. 2 was Ruth Shirkey of San Jose.

With her U.S.-bred Hanoverian mare Wyleigh Princess, Shirkey was capping off a tremendous weekend by taking home the Two-Tone Malone Trophy for the $1,000 CDS Horse of the Year in the Second Level Adult Amateur division with an overall score of 68.256%. But the special partnership she now has with her horse almost never happened at all save for one crucial decision.

“My favorite story is that I purchased Wyleigh Princess in utero, and I was really hoping for a black colt,” Shirkey remembered. “When she was born, her breeder called and said, ‘The good news is that the foal is black. The bad news is that it’s a filly.’ She said that if I didn’t want her, to just let them know because they actually really wanted to keep her. So I thought about it for a day and decided I still wanted her, primarily because I really, really wanted a foal by Weltmeyer. So of course in hindsight it was one of the best decisions I ever made.”

Monumental Day

After years of inspired effort, a Memorial to SSgt. Reckless finds a home at Camp Pendleton.

From Horsetrader staff reports - October 6th, 2016
As a new SSgt. Reckless monument is lowered into a permanent place at Camp Pendleton, the mare seems alert to her surroundings.

As a new SSgt. Reckless monument is lowered into a permanent place at Camp Pendleton, the mare seems alert to her surroundings.

Horsetrader photo

CAMP PENDLETON — October 26 was a significant date for a big-hearted mare off a racetrack in South Korea. It was on that day in 1952 that Reckless joined the United States Marine Corps. Her eventual battlefield heroics — real, not from Hollywood — would be unforgettable to those who witnessed them.

It’s no coincidence that, after years of inspired effort, a magnificent monument to SSgt Reckless will be dedicated on Oct. 26 this year at Camp Pendleton, the mare’s final resting place.

The hour-long ceremony that will begin at 10 a.m. is open to the public, and speakers will include Brigadier General Kevin Killea, Commanding Officer at Camp Pendleton, monument founder and Best Selling-author Robin Hutton and Jocelyn Russell, the renowned sculptor of the statue. Also present will be about a half-dozen of the men who served with her in Korea and Camp Pendleton, or grew up with her and have memories of Reckless.

Fire in horse country

Sand Fire burns 40,000 acres in Santa Clarita area in L.A. County

- August 4th, 2016
The Sand Fire began its tear through the Angeles Forest in L.A. County on July 22.

The Sand Fire began its tear through the Angeles Forest in L.A. County on July 22.

Katharine Lotze photo

SANTA CLARITA — Hundreds of horses were evacuated in a late July wildfire in northern Los Angeles County that scorched more than 40,000 acres in and near the Angeles National Forest.

The fire that began Friday afternoon near Sand Canyon Road took almost three days to fully contain, destroying 18 homes and killing a man during the fierce first 48 hours. More than 20,000 people were evacuated.

The blaze also destroyed Sable Ranch, a longtime Southern California location for film and TV shoots that succumbed on Saturday. The ranch was a popular location for Westerns with its Spanish-style hacienda, stables and various out buildings. Among the numerous shows shot there were television’s Maverick, The A-Team, and 24.