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WASHINGTON, D.C.– When is a commercial driver’s license required for transporting horses? What should you do or say if you are hauling your horses to a show and stopped by a federal safety official?

Those are the types of questions that the American Horse Council wanted answered by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) after a recent meeting in response to the AHC request for clarification. On Feb. 26, the FMCSA published two documents to promote understanding of the regulations and also how to discern whether or not a carrier can be excluding from the commercial driver’s license requirement.

Susie and Woody soaring high and fast.

Susie and Woody soaring high and fast.

Photo courtesy Susie Hutchison

SAN DIEGO — Twelve years to the day after his passing, Samsung Woodstock, the chestnut gelding who won scores of show jumping honors and the hearts of fans worldwide, received the California Professional Horseman’s Association Equine Lifetime Achievement Award.

The presentation, made to his career-long partner, Susie Hutchison, was a highlight of the Jan. 5 Awards Banquet held this year at the Manchester Grand Hyatt on San Diego Bay.

“There was never a course I walked that looked too high or too wide — that I didn’t know we could do it,” said Hutchison, who is competing at the HITS Coachella circuit.

Her first win on the 16-1-hand “Woody,” in the 1987 Derby in Pebble Beach, came just days after the German-bred Westphalian had arrived from Europe. Their final victory at the 1997 Los Angeles National Grand Prix capped a career that featured 20 grand prix wins, plus qualifications for the World Equestrian Games and three World Cup Finals, the 1990 PCHA Horse of the Year Award, and the 1992 AGA Rider of the Year honor. In 1997, Breyer Animal Creations issued the Samsung Woodstock model horse.

The Comeback Trail

Rebuilding areas charred by December wildfires is under way

- February 1st, 2018

SUNLAND — The trauma of December’s wildfires — and subsequent mudslides a month later in some areas — is far from forgotten in communities from San Diego County to Central California, and in many places, victim needs still outstrip supplies. But signs of recovery are appearing, slowly.

While the toll of the terrible trio — the Lilac Fire in Bonsall, Creek Fire in Los Angeles and Thomas Fire in Ventura County –is still being calculated, groups are forming both formally and informally to mutually support and educate neighbors in respective communities.

Deer Springs Equestrian in San Marcos, a few miles due south of the Lilac Fire, conducted a two-hour equine microchip clinic on Jan. 13, where Dr. Emily Sandler of Pacific Coast Equine Veterinary Services micro-chipped and registered horses.

The local advocacy group, the Twin Oaks Valley Equestrian Association, sent out a comprehensive self-evacuation guide that could be a difference-maker in preparation for a future event. The guide is rooted in the Cal Fire Volunteers in Prevention campaign after the June 2008 Lightning Strike Fires in Tehama County. (A link to this guide is at the end of this article).

In the area struck by the Creek Fire in Los Angeles, equestrians are working together to educate, plan and communicate using lessons learned from the Dec. 6 firestorm, which devastated longtime equestrian centerpieces in their community like Middle Ranch and Gibson Ranch.

Gibson Ranch to reopen on Jan. 15

- January 1st, 2018
A wreath brightens the bleakness of a gutted stall.

A wreath brightens the bleakness of a gutted stall.

Sarah Williams photo

SUNLAND — For decades, Dale Gibson has been among the first to hitch his trailer and evacuate horses threatened by wildfires in the Los Angeles area. In fact, he would safely stage the animals at his Gibson Ranch until the smoke would clear — which is exactly what he was doing the morning of Dec. 6 when the Creek Fire ignited. When fierce winds shifted flames rapidly toward his facility, his crew and volunteers raced to remove 130 horses — 45 evacuees and 85 of his own — before the fire eventually consumed it. All animals made it out, including cattle used in his popular team sortings.

Gibson announced recently that he will rebuild “on the shoulders of awesome people”, including friends,volunteers, and vendors like Castlebrook Barns, with a proposed reopening Jan. 15.

MORE ONLINE: Http://bit.ly/801-gibson

Free CRHA reining clinic at L.A. Equestrian Center & more

From the Horsetrader sales staff - January 1st, 2018

InGate graphicNow here’s an opportunity that will send you spinning! On Feb. 10, the California Reining Horse Association will host a FREE Reining Clinic at the Los Angeles Equestrian Center with five top championship reiners, including Tom Foran, Brenda Brown, Mike Berg, Monica Albair, and Daphne Foran. Space is limited, and reservations are required. Contact the CRHA office via email at CRHAsecretary@aol.com or visit http://bit.ly/8clinic to access the entry form, release form or to register for vendor space during the event. This will be a day to remember for both participants and spectators. Reserve your spot today!

The CRHA was formed in 1993 and is an affiliate of the National Reining Horse Association. The Southern California-based group promotes reining in the region with events throughout the year and offers its members a variety of opportunities to compete for year-end buckles and awards, as well as a saddle for the coveted “Reiner of the Year”.

EHV-1 Recap in L.A.

Dr. Kent Fowler of the CDFA discusses facts and reminders after last fall’s viral episode in Los Angeles

- June 1st, 2017

NewstraderDr. Kent Fowler of the California Department of Food and Agriculture returned to Los Angeles April 17 to address horse owners about the Equine Herpes Virus-1 (EHV-1) , a health threat that became intimately familiar to the area after an outbreak last fall. The “all-clear” was issued months ago, but knowledge of the virus’s detection, treatment and mitigation are invaluable going forward wherever horses reside. Equine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy (EHM) is the designation given to a horse showing neurologic dysfunction caused by the EHV-1 virus.

Something really BIG this month at Big Horse

From the Horsetrader sales staff - June 1st, 2017

If you’re in the mood to shop for the cutest clothes, jewelry, boots, and hats on the planet, then just don’t save the date, tear the Big Horse Feed and Mercantile ad out of this magazine and put it on the fridge. Friday and Saturday, June 23-24, marks Big Horse’s 19th Annual Anniversary Sale, and you’re in for some real deals. Hailed as the go-to event of the year, you’ll find savings in nearly every department and have the opportunity to talk directly with manufacturer reps of some of your favorite products, meet up with friends and have a great time. Home décor? Got it! English and western riding gear and helmets? Got it! Saddles and tack? Got it! Handbags and purses? Got it! And the fun just doesn’t stop there. The first 100 customers each day will receive a free gift — there will be hourly drawings for great prizes, and you can enter to win the grand prize drawing of a $200 gift card. As you’re heading out the door, don’t forget to grab the ad on the fridge! With it, you’ll receive a 30 percent discount on one of your favorite items with a $50 purchase (exclusions apply). See you at Big Horse for sizzling summer savings for you, your home, horse and hound!

907688-1705A Newstrader PHOTO_AAGOURA HILLS — James Wyllie, a fabled Los Angeles equestrian educator, father, and grandfather, died March 16 in Agoura Hills at age 98.

Born March 2, 1919, in Lincoln, R.I, Wyllie’s remarkable teaching career spanned six decades. He continued to instruct students in the ways of the horse until shortly before he died. From preschoolers to senior citizens, Wyllie taught over 65,000 people to ride.

Wyllie taught courses at UCLA, Cal-Lutheran, and for 30 years at Malibu’s Pepperdine University, plus ongoing courses for Santa Monica College. He was firm but kind, principled but fun, and never stopped being curious about life.

NewstraderWinter rains will soon yield to a green spring, and trails days will be on the calendars of many communities. One of them is the City of San Marcos, which will hold its 26th annual Trails Day Saturday, March 4, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

The free event has an 8 a.m. sign-up, and the Twin Oaks Valley Equestrian Association will lead a guided ride through the North San Diego County hills. Equestrians will meet at the Ridgeline Trail at 102 San Elijo Road. Other organized hikes and rides for hikers and mountain bikers are scheduled too, in different staging areas. Live music, food and free giveaways will be available to enjoy all morning.

For additional information, contact the City of San Marcos Community Services at (760) 744-9000, extension 3535.

MORE ONLINE: Http://bit.ly/703_NTC

WOODSIDE — A celebration of life was held Jan. 21 for Jarrod Gimple, son of Southern California horseman and longtime horse show manager Larry Gimple, after an off-road accident New Year’s Eve took his life.

NewstraderFriends and family filled the gathering at The Horse Park at Woodside on what would have been Jarrod’s 27th birthday. Larry performed the heartfelt eulogy on the stormy day.

“To the weather, I know for a fact that Jarrod wouldn’t want this day any other way — rainy, windy, muddy and challenging!”, his father said. “A friend shared a quote with me just recently by Bob Marley: ‘Some people feel the rain, others just get wet.’ Jarrod was definitely a young man who felt the rain.”

Larry spoke of his son’s strengths and independence, sharing anecdotes about his son’s determined efforts to break a young foal and ride bulls in Montana. He also paid tribute to Jarrod’s generosity and courage.