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Simply Rancho

Charm, beauty, climate and horses make village of Rancho Santa Fe unique

AUDREY PAVIA for the Horsetrader - April 16th, 2015

The San Diego Polo Club holds matches through much of the year.

The San Diego Polo Club holds matches through much of the year.

San Diego Polo Club photo

RANCHO SANTA FE — Swaying eucalyptus trees, the sweet scent of jasmine, and golden sunlight on the hillsides; if ever a community could be described as epitomizing all that’s beautiful in Southern California, it’s Rancho Santa Fe.

Rancho Santa Fe is situated 20 miles north of downtown San Diego and only four miles from the ocean. It is filled with upscale homes, luxurious golf courses, an exclusive tennis club, and plenty of horses.

Not only is Rancho Santa Fe known for its beauty and wealth (it is the highest income community in the United States), it is also renowned for the expertise of many of the equestrians who live and train there.

The town is a haven for those who are serious about their horses.

Where Reins meet the Sea

Encinitas, Olivenhain remain two San Diego County jewels

AUDREY PAVIA for the Horsetrader - April 16th, 2015

ENCINITAS — Many towns north of San Diego contribute to San Diego County’s reputation as being one of the most beautiful places in the United States. But two of the region’s crowning jewels—both with an equestrian flair—have to be Encinitas and Olivenhain.

Characterized by pristine beaches, rolling hills and bucolic ranches, Encinitas and Olivenhain are not only renowned for their beautiful scenery and perfect weather but also for the richness of their equestrian communities.

A SoCal Jewel

Swallows...and horsepeople migrate to San Juan Capistrano

AUDREY PAVIA for the Horsetrader - March 19th, 2015

The undeveloped hills of SJC provide a peaceful retreat.

The undeveloped hills of SJC provide a peaceful retreat.

Photo courtesy of SJCEC

SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO — Most people know San Juan Capistrano for its swallows, tenacious little songbirds that return to the picturesque Southern California town every spring. But San Juan Capistrano is more than just a place for migrating birds. The city is also home to a vast number of people and their horses.

The history of horses in San Juan Capistrano goes back to the city’s beginnings in the 1700s, when Father Junipero Serra first founded the mission. By placing the flag of Spain on a plot of land just five miles from the ocean, halfway between what would become the cities of Los Angeles and San Diego, Father Serra laid down the roots of a town that would come to be known for its historic architecture and equestrian lifestyle.