Go to FastAd#:
Search "News" for:

Human-horse connections

- April 1st, 2020

By Sheryl Lynde | Horsetrader columnist

Anything of value we treat with the utmost care. Well, I’m about to tell you a story that has tremendous value, to the American Mustang and to our veterans who have served our country…and to our society as a whole.

My only hope is that I give the story the justice it deserves. (I will do my best.)

This is not a tragedy, it is a story of resilience, purpose and connection — a human-horse connection.

Seek your horse’s purpose

- March 3rd, 2020

By Sheryl Lynde | Horsetrader columnist

Studies show that one third of the people asked about their job will tell you that they hate it. Two thirds of people will tell you that they feel a lack of purpose or fulfillment. They feel that their job is not a good fit for them even though they are great at performing the tasks of their position and are financially successful.

We spend 40 percent of our lives working. Abraham Maslow, author and American psychologist, created a hierarchy of needs he felt were essential in order for us to feel a sense of contentment in our lives. At the bottom of the list is the first level that is concerned with our physiological needs. These needs determine your ability to provide for your basic demands for survival and safety, such as shelter, food, etc.. At the top of the list is self-actualization, which refers to the ability to realize, grow and contribute whatever your innate gifts or skills that you possess. To be authentic, to bloom or realize your full potential, self actualization is a critical component to your sense of belonging and your self worth.

Desensitizing

- February 5th, 2020

By Sheryl Lynde | Horsetrader columnist

Over the years, training has continued to evolve. We change our training methods and techniques to benefit and bring out the best in each individual horse—instead of making the horse fit our own personal goals as well as expecting unreasonable results from an inflexible training program. I remember years ago taking instruction from a trainer. He said something that has always stayed with me. He told me that if I would come back to him in a year’s time and he is still teaching the same thing, then I should find myself another instructor.

What I know for sure

- January 3rd, 2020

By Sheryl Lynde | Horsetrader columnist

There are a couple of things I know for sure.

Whenever I work with a horse, I am looking for some improvement. Some days, the progress may be undeniable and obvious. Other days, it is just a lightness in their body that I can feel. What I know for sure is that I cannot expect the horse to make a change if I don’t change how I ride. It starts with me.

Leadership through Awareness

- December 2nd, 2019

By Sheryl Lynde | Horsetrader columnist

A client whose horse I had in training some time ago returned for follow-up instruction. After watching me work with her horse for a few minutes, she made the observation that he respected me more than her. She said that when she took him home from training, he was attentive and respectful, but after a period of time, she lost it, Now she wanted to know how to get it back.

How do you get respect from your horse? You have to lead. What exactly does it mean to be the leader that your horse is looking for?

Character vs. comfort

- November 8th, 2019

By Sheryl Lynde | Horsetrader columnist

Character is forged when you dare to leave your comfort zone. It is built by being aware and true to who you are, by reaching to be better than you were yesterday, by having a willingness to grow, and by doing the right thing even when no one is looking.

Working with horses has always been a source of inspiration to know better, to be better. As quoted by Robert Iger, CEO of the Walt Disney Company: “to know what I don’t, and trust what I do know.”

Well-broke horses take time

- October 1st, 2019

By Sheryl Lynde | Horsetrader columnist


There are some youngsters who sail through the training program, and they are what I call “born broke.

They take each step easily and with confidence, and their progress is measurable each day. They can be ridden within the first couple of weeks of their arrival. They’ve been handled properly all their life, carried a saddle, ponied and introduced to new locations and environments.

And then there are the others, the ones that take more time. I’ve had a number of these over the years and these are the ones that have taught me the most. I have committed each one to memory, both successes and setbacks alike. I’ve learned when to be more creative in getting a step introduced, how to listen, and especially patience. These are the ones that have taught me the most in how to develop feel for different situations. I’ve learned it takes time. There are no shortcuts. Just as in life, there will be setbacks. But even in the setbacks, you learn.

Tools of the Trade

- September 3rd, 2019

By Sheryl Lynde | Horsetrader columnist

The round pen: A great place to visit, but I wouldn’t want to live there.

The round pen has been an invaluable training aid for me over the years. It offers a confined space (60 feet) to safely start colts as well as to resolve dangerous behavioral issues like rearing, bucking and bolting. It has its purpose, it is a training aid just as the snaffle or driving reins are training aids.

But, just like any aid, it isn’t meant to be overused or lived in. If you stay in there too long it can work against you.

It depends…

- August 1st, 2019

By Sheryl Lynde | Horsetrader columnist

My first initial response to most questions asked that relate to various behavioral issues is, “it depends.”

There is no pat answer that applies for starting colts or resolving issues. The many variables are broad and wide-ranging.

Take this trailer-loading issue:

A young horse has been purchased and loads in the trailer willingly, without any issues. As time progresses under the new ownership, the horse begins to refuse to load. The resistance increases with each attempt. After considerable time and effort, the owner experiences only momentary success after endless coaxing brings forth just enough forward movement to get all four feet inside the trailer. However, relief is short-lived. When reaching to tie the lead rope, the youngster bolts out backward. They return to square one. The owner’s confidence is undermined, and frustration seeps into all further efforts. The plans to be somewhere are derailed.

What’s the fix? Well… it depends.


If at first you don’t succeed…you’re normal.
—Rick Warren


If your training is producing unwanted results, or if you gave a less-than-stellar performance at the last show, congratulations—you’ve just learned what doesn’t work.

I believe failure occurs when people blame. By blaming, the only pay-off will be attracting other people to your circle who also blame.

As Warren says in the first sentence of his book, The Purpose Driven Life, “It’s not about me.”