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Bringing home a new horse

- August 2nd, 2020

By Sheryl Lynde | Horsetrader columnist

Years ago, I purchased my first mare, Missy. We got along really well as I tested her out at her previous owner’s place. However when I brought her home, she became aggressive.

As I entered her pen the next day, she pinned her ears, bared her teeth and charged me. This was such a departure from her behavior while at the owner’s place. I never felt that I had been misled – I just thought the behavior was due to the change in her environment. I needed to establish my authority, not necessarily for disciplinary action, but in order to create a familiar hierarchy that made sense to her and restored order.

Weighing in

- June 30th, 2020

By Sheryl Lynde | Horsetrader columnist

I am a student of the horse. Life is a constant pursuit of truth, and we get to it by asking one question at a time. Everyone has opinions and they are entitled to those opinions. But opinions are a compilation of personal perceptions, preferences and biases developed over a lifetime of experiences and are frequently very different from facts.

Two tales of match-making

- June 2nd, 2020

By Sheryl Lynde | Horsetrader columnist

A round the start of my career, a gentleman brought me a pony to train for his 12-year old granddaughter. He had purchased him with the intention to ride together on the weekends in his local equestrian community. Riding in equestrian communities can be challenging with street traffic, dogs charging fences and other unforeseen obstacles.

Human Horse Connection

- May 5th, 2020

By Sheryl Lynde | Horsetrader columnist

A couple of colts came to me to start and sell. However, they needed more time. Although they had progressed, the full extent of their potential had yet to be realized. I could feel it.

Just like us, some colts take longer to bloom. Additionally, I didn’t feel that the prospective buyers were a good match. Someone was going to get hurt and both the human and the colt’s confidence would be undermined. So I bought them. Neither colt was easy. I’ve put an additional three years of training on one, and the other has had an additional year. To see their natural ability and confidence develop gives me tremendous satisfaction in knowing that they have a chance for a secured future. This is my purpose.

Human-horse connections

- April 1st, 2020

By Sheryl Lynde | Horsetrader columnist

Anything of value we treat with the utmost care. Well, I’m about to tell you a story that has tremendous value, to the American Mustang and to our veterans who have served our country…and to our society as a whole.

My only hope is that I give the story the justice it deserves. (I will do my best.)

This is not a tragedy, it is a story of resilience, purpose and connection — a human-horse connection.

Seek your horse’s purpose

- March 3rd, 2020

By Sheryl Lynde | Horsetrader columnist

Studies show that one third of the people asked about their job will tell you that they hate it. Two thirds of people will tell you that they feel a lack of purpose or fulfillment. They feel that their job is not a good fit for them even though they are great at performing the tasks of their position and are financially successful.

We spend 40 percent of our lives working. Abraham Maslow, author and American psychologist, created a hierarchy of needs he felt were essential in order for us to feel a sense of contentment in our lives. At the bottom of the list is the first level that is concerned with our physiological needs. These needs determine your ability to provide for your basic demands for survival and safety, such as shelter, food, etc.. At the top of the list is self-actualization, which refers to the ability to realize, grow and contribute whatever your innate gifts or skills that you possess. To be authentic, to bloom or realize your full potential, self actualization is a critical component to your sense of belonging and your self worth.

Desensitizing

- February 5th, 2020

By Sheryl Lynde | Horsetrader columnist

Over the years, training has continued to evolve. We change our training methods and techniques to benefit and bring out the best in each individual horse—instead of making the horse fit our own personal goals as well as expecting unreasonable results from an inflexible training program. I remember years ago taking instruction from a trainer. He said something that has always stayed with me. He told me that if I would come back to him in a year’s time and he is still teaching the same thing, then I should find myself another instructor.

What I know for sure

- January 3rd, 2020

By Sheryl Lynde | Horsetrader columnist

There are a couple of things I know for sure.

Whenever I work with a horse, I am looking for some improvement. Some days, the progress may be undeniable and obvious. Other days, it is just a lightness in their body that I can feel. What I know for sure is that I cannot expect the horse to make a change if I don’t change how I ride. It starts with me.

Leadership through Awareness

- December 2nd, 2019

By Sheryl Lynde | Horsetrader columnist

A client whose horse I had in training some time ago returned for follow-up instruction. After watching me work with her horse for a few minutes, she made the observation that he respected me more than her. She said that when she took him home from training, he was attentive and respectful, but after a period of time, she lost it, Now she wanted to know how to get it back.

How do you get respect from your horse? You have to lead. What exactly does it mean to be the leader that your horse is looking for?

Character vs. comfort

- November 8th, 2019

By Sheryl Lynde | Horsetrader columnist

Character is forged when you dare to leave your comfort zone. It is built by being aware and true to who you are, by reaching to be better than you were yesterday, by having a willingness to grow, and by doing the right thing even when no one is looking.

Working with horses has always been a source of inspiration to know better, to be better. As quoted by Robert Iger, CEO of the Walt Disney Company: “to know what I don’t, and trust what I do know.”