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What’s in a foal exam – and why?

By DANIEL H. GROVE, DVM - March 1st, 2017

AskTheVetFoaling season is upon us.  Foals are dropping left and right.  From 12 to 24  hours after birth, it is an excellent idea to have your newborn evaluated by your veterinarian.  This month, I would like to discuss what I do on my new foal exams and why.  I do them in the same order every time so that I do not miss anything.  I start at the tail and work my way forward.

Genitalia — The first area I start with.  I determine the sex of the foal and examine the external genitalia to make sure things are normal.  Does the vulva appear normal if it is a filly? And on the males, are both testes down?

It’s reining!

CRHA kicks off 2017 season with Bunny Slide at LAEC

Special to the Horsetrader - March 1st, 2017

BURBANK — A new year of reining competition launched Feb. 3-5 at the Los Angeles Equestrian Center where the California Reining Horse Association held its season-opening Bunny Slide.

With more than $11,500 in added money and a qualifier for National Reining Horse Association Affiliate points, this event had no shortage of top horses and riders hopping to it.

$100K Bond

Ashlee Bond and Chela CS win $100,000 Longines FEI World Cup qualifier at HITS

Special to the Horsetrader - March 1st, 2017

THERMAL — The sun shined bright above the desert sky at HITS Desert Horse Park as the crowd gathered to watch the $100,000 Longines FEI World Cup™ Qualifier Feb. 11. The competition served as the grand finale of the Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping Thermal event during week IV of the HITS Coachella Desert Circuit.

An impressive lineup of horses and riders from California and around the globe gathered to jump for the final West Coast qualifying opportunity and a $100,000 purse.

As the last stop for qualifiers on the West Coast commenced, riders were hungry for the opportunity to qualify for the Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping Final to be held in Omaha, Neb., March 29–April 2.

NewstraderWinter rains will soon yield to a green spring, and trails days will be on the calendars of many communities. One of them is the City of San Marcos, which will hold its 26th annual Trails Day Saturday, March 4, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

The free event has an 8 a.m. sign-up, and the Twin Oaks Valley Equestrian Association will lead a guided ride through the North San Diego County hills. Equestrians will meet at the Ridgeline Trail at 102 San Elijo Road. Other organized hikes and rides for hikers and mountain bikers are scheduled too, in different staging areas. Live music, food and free giveaways will be available to enjoy all morning.

For additional information, contact the City of San Marcos Community Services at (760) 744-9000, extension 3535.

MORE ONLINE: Http://bit.ly/703_NTC

WOODSIDE — A celebration of life was held Jan. 21 for Jarrod Gimple, son of Southern California horseman and longtime horse show manager Larry Gimple, after an off-road accident New Year’s Eve took his life.

NewstraderFriends and family filled the gathering at The Horse Park at Woodside on what would have been Jarrod’s 27th birthday. Larry performed the heartfelt eulogy on the stormy day.

“To the weather, I know for a fact that Jarrod wouldn’t want this day any other way — rainy, windy, muddy and challenging!”, his father said. “A friend shared a quote with me just recently by Bob Marley: ‘Some people feel the rain, others just get wet.’ Jarrod was definitely a young man who felt the rain.”

Larry spoke of his son’s strengths and independence, sharing anecdotes about his son’s determined efforts to break a young foal and ride bulls in Montana. He also paid tribute to Jarrod’s generosity and courage.

Larry Langer, a part of the horse industry for 66 years — from starting lessons as a child to his induction into the Show Jumping Hall of Fame — was honored in January for his devotion to equestrian sport with the Lifetime Achievement Award.
“It was both a surprise and a great honor to be chosen for this award, and I am extremely grateful to have been selected,” said Larry. “I am very proud to figuratively stand next to the likes of Bill Steinkraus, Frank Chapot, George Morris, Jimmy Woford, and Bert De Nemethy. It truly represents the crowning achievement of my lifetime in a sport that I love dearly, and it pays tribute to the horse, who plays the essential role in it.”

MORE ONLINE: Http://bit.ly/703_NTA

Getting the turnaround right

Les Vogt for the Horsetrader - March 1st, 2017

More With Les graphicWhen you first start the exercise, I think it’s a good idea to push him up with both legs and then open your inside leg as you start the turn to help the horse find the move that you’re after. Also, approaching the turn with some inside leg will discourage your horse from leaning on your inside rein as you start to turn. If you feel him starting to lean, you might want to go back to exercise number two for a while and lighten him up. One thing to be careful of is that if he starts to lean or twist his head in the turnaround, he could end up shifting his weight to the outside hind leg, rather than the inside. We’ll be riding him into the turn with both legs once he gets the hang of it, but opening your inside leg at first is fine and can help your horse along.

The 4 common mistakes riders make

By Sheryl Lynde / Horsetrader columnist - March 1st, 2017

Trainer TipsWhen people come for a lesson or an evaluation, there are common mistakes shared by most riders. Let’s talk about the Top Four and the remedy for each.

1. Lack of Rein Management
Reins being either too loose or too tight pose risks to a rider’s safety. When the reins are too loose, the rider’s hands are out of position, as they rise to their chest or chin in order to make contact with the bit. To make up for a lag in contact and response, the rider develops fast hands and jerks to get the response they are looking for.

Having the reins too tight causes the horse to brace against the rider’s hands. Since the horse learns from release and not pressure, there are limited training opportunities. The horse becomes micromanaged, meaning there is constant contact. Therefore, the horse is given no release for the correct response, and the rider balances on the horse’s mouth instead of their seat and is easily out of control.

Q&A Dr. Katie Flynn

- February 1st, 2017

1702 CoverCalifornia’s ranking equine vet has a passion for horses — and also their well-being. This winter’s containment of an EHV-1 outbreak in Los Angeles County put Dr. Flynn and her California Division of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) colleagues on the frontlines — and the importance of public awareness in the headlines.

Horses surround your work. How have they surrounded your life?

Horses are my passion. I grew up on a family Standardbred racehorse farm in South Grafton, Mass. I learned to drive “Terry Anns Choice” at a young age and foaled out one of her colts on my own when I was 16. While growing up, I traveled with my dad to paddock horses at harness racing tracks across New England and New York.
My first horse appeared on my back doorstep as a gift one Christmas morning, “Strawberry Sundae,” a strawberry roan mare. We became a team and participated in 4-H and local fair horse shows. We also used to wrangle up the occasional Hereford beef cow that got loose on the family farm.
I am busy now with my career in regulatory medicine in California, but I look forward to my visits back east when I can jog a family racehorse. I hope to one day own a few Standardbred racehorses to carry on the family tradition.

Remembering Benny Guitron

NRCHA Hall of Famer and Snaffle Bit Champion leaves an influential legacy in the horse world

- February 1st, 2017
Benny Guitron salutes at the 2009 Magnificant 7 at Western States Horse Expo in Sacramento.

Benny Guitron salutes at the 2009 Magnificant 7 at Western States Horse Expo in Sacramento.
Kathy Higgins Photo

MERCED — California horseman and 20-Year breeder Benny Guitron of Merced died Dec. 18 following complications with cancer.

Born February 12, 1948, in Glendale, Benny was raised on his family’s farm in Indio. His father was a farmer and enjoyed attending horse shows. He took Benny with him every chance he had, and Benny grew to love the reined cow horse sport. Reared around famous horsemen such as Jimmy Williams, Harold Farren, Red Neal, Don Dodge and Tony Amaral, Benny’s appreciation and love for the old traditions took hold of him at a young age. Fascinated by the vaquero customs since childhood, Guitron painstakingly learned the process of working and training horses.

It was during the 1970s that Benny Guitron truly stepped into his own in regard to the life that he would lead as a horseman. When his father passed away, he truly felt the need to pursue horses, reined cow horses to be exact. Contacting his “hero,” Tony Amaral, Benny went to work for him and later worked with Bobby Ingersoll before purchasing his own facility in Merced.

Through the years, Benny became known as a historian who has worked to preserve the history of the people and horses who make up the reined cow horse. He was dedicated to the heritage of the event, lifestyle and continuation of the National Reined Cow Horse Association, which makes it no wonder why he was inducted into the NRCHA Hall of Fame in 2015.