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Sister rivalry

Non Pro siblings Ingrid Vangelos and Ruth Noring may finally face off in the SCRCHA Saddle Shoot Out

- October 1st, 2017

TEMECULA – Ingrid Vangelos can remember her childhood days in the Bay Area when she and her sister, Ruth Noring, chased one another around the house with horse whips.

“We fought like cats and dogs,” laughs Ingrid. “But then, from the time we were teen-agers on, we’ve been super close. No one was closer.”

The siblings have a horse-riding history, from their first ponies and hunter-jumper action to a point after college where horses vanished for a while. They’ve come full circle after rekindling their horse lives, and now are both active competitors as members of the Southern California Reined Cow Horse Association.

Fall’s here — and so are great horse events!

From the Horsetrader sales staff - October 1st, 2017

InGate graphicWhether you compete on your horse or not, you’ll find excellent events to attend in fall, and this month is proof!

In Norco, a new event for the equine industry presented by Thrifty Horse Consignment Shoppe will enliven the George Ingalls Equestrian Center Oct. 6-8, as the inaugural Norco Horse Affair comes to Horsetown USA. The entire venue will be teeming with demonstrations, clinics, entertainment, shopping, and an educational equine symposium. (See event program in this issue of the Horsetrader, pages 37-51!) Admission is only $15 per carload, or $5 per walk-in. Much of these proceeds with go to benefit several local area non-profit organizations. Purina Animal Nutrition will also be inviting Norco Horse Affair attendees to enter its drawing for a chance to win an all-expense paid trip for two to the Purina Nutrition Center as a 2018 Professional Horse VIP. This high-tech research facility located in Gray Summit, Mo., is a 1,200-acre working farm with separate units devoted to equine, dairy, swine, cattle and companion animal research. Caring for over 1,000 animals in every stage of development, Purina researchers seek vital new data in areas like digestive physiology, animal metabolism, and growth and development. Stop by the Purina Animal Nutrition booth in the California Horsetrader Breed Pavilion to register. Don’t forget — you can find the Norco Horse Affair Program on page 37 with the map, vendor list, daily schedules, clinician bios, and more! You won’t want to miss the All American Horse Challenge with Mary Rose Anderson (see schedule). You can also visit NorcoHorseAffair.com for more details.

Corey Cushing went 1-2 in the NSHA Open Futurity, winning $25,055 for the title on San Juan Ranch's SJR Smooth Rio (shown here) and another $16,006 for the reserve on Moonstruck Striker, owned by Wendy Dunn.

Corey Cushing went 1-2 in the NSHA Open Futurity, winning $25,055 for the title on San Juan Ranch’s SJR Smooth Rio (shown here) and another $16,006 for the reserve on Moonstruck Striker, owned by Wendy Dunn.

Stacy Judd photo

PASO ROBLES — The National Reined Cow Horse Association moved its World Championship Snaffle Bit Futurity to Fort Worth starting this year, but the cradle of reined cow horse still runs strong.

The California-based National Stock Horse Association held its biggest gathering of the year Aug. 22-27 at the Paso Robles Events Center, and the only thing hotter than the heat wave was the competition.

The payouts were downright cool, especially for Corey Cushing, who took first and second in the NSHA Open Futurity on SJR Smooth Rio (Smooth As A Cat X Shiners Diamond Girl), owned by San Juan Ranch, and Moonstruck Striker (Dual Rey x Moonstruck Cat), owned by Eric and Wendy Dunn. The impressive payouts for the Championship ($25,055) and Reserve ($16,006) along with Cushing’s other money-placing — aboard Kevin and Sydney Knight’s Maliblus Most Wanted in a tie for 16th ($1,539) tallied up to a $42,600 take-home in the class.

In the Futurity Intermediate Open, the 2016 World’s Greatest Horseman Champion, Clayton Edsall, rode Bet He Sparks (Bet Hesa Cat x Sparking Train) to the win with a 658.5 composite score. Owner K & L Phillips LLC went home with a check for $8,418, along with an additional $9,234 from their fourth-place finish in the Open.

Making of a ‘Keeper’ takes time

By Sheryl Lynde - October 1st, 2017

Trainer TipsIn preparation for my upcoming demonstrations at the Norco Horse Affair Oct. 6-8, I sent out a request for a fearful horse to use. Immediately, I received responses and videos. I selected the first one I received, but another horse that came in later reminded me of an 18-month-old colt that once was sent to me to start.

Starlight Sam I Am was his name, and he had a common link to the horse recently offered to me for my demo – they had a level of fear that would not be fixed in an hour’s time.

Sam’s fear was unpredictable and explosive. He was a danger to himself and anyone handling him. He lacked self-preservation, meaning if he put himself through a fence during one of his episodes — so be it. This wasn’t due to anything the owner had caused. Sam arrived with his baggage. An attempt to touch his hind legs would elicit a rapid-fire kick. One day he would accept the saddle, but the very next day while repeating the identical steps, he would flip over backward multiple times. As soon as he got to his feet, he would launch into a 20-minute bucking spree with me on the other end of the lead rope, trying to keep him contained in the round pen.

The ‘to-do list’ when Fall arrives

By Daniel M. Grove, DVM - October 1st, 2017

AskTheVetFall is a great time of year. Temperatures start to decrease, the leaves start to change, and the major holidays are right around the corner. Before life gets away from you with family, don’t forget about your horses. In the fall, there are some routine things that you should be looking at.

This time of year, showing is usually still going strong. In order to keep your athlete ready for the task, make sure you are up to date on vaccines and deworming. In the spring, most people get their major vaccines done. Influenza and Rhinopneumonitis vaccines work well, but not for very long. It is estimated that the antibody levels they stimulate subside in seven to eight months. Therefore, it is usually recommended to give a six-month booster in the fall for these two ailments. This vaccine is typically much cheaper than the ones in the spring. There are intramuscular and intranasal products available. Discuss with your veterinarian what will work best for you.

Talent found

USEF Show Jumping Talent Search West finals showcase top regional talent

Special to the Horsetrader - October 1st, 2017
Halie Robinson and Caracas 89 soar to victory in the 2017 Platinum Performance/USEF Show Jumping Talent Search Finals - West.

Halie Robinson and Caracas 89 soar to victory in the 2017 Platinum Performance/USEF Show Jumping Talent Search Finals – West.

Amy McCool photo

SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO — The third time in the top 10 was the charm for Halie Robinson in the Platinum Performance/USEF Show Jumping Talent Search Finals – West. Having placed second and fifth in years past, Robinson rode with precision, consistency and previous experience that earned her the top call in this year’s challenging four-phase competition.

USEF Talent Search judges, Andre Dignelli, of Katonah, NY, and Patricia Griffith of New York City, designed the courses with Anthony D’Ambrosio serving as Technical Delegate. Well-suited for their roles, Dignelli won the prestigious class in 1986, and has since taken countless riders to success at this level; Griffith was second under Dignelli’s tutelage in 1998 and has been a part of Dignelli’s Heritage Farm since 1997. D’Ambrosio has been a technical delegate as well as a course designer at venues all over the world.Friday morning’s flat phase asked riders to demonstrate knowledge of the elementary principles of dressage training as they affect a show jumper’s performance. Divided into three groups, riders were tested with half-pass, counter-canter, flying lead changes and other exercises. The gymnastics phase asked riders to apply mastery of that flat work to jumping patterns, including the skills of shortening and lengthening the horse’s stride while riding the track, which proved challenging for many.

Steps to great stops

Foundation Training for the Performance Horse with Les Vogt

Les Vogt for the Horsetrader - October 1st, 2017

More With Les graphicJust like with everything else, there is a program for developing great stops on your horse, and the exercise we call the collected stop is the first phase. This stop exercise is critically important because it is where you begin to teach your horse to stop with the correct form.

I think it works so well because when you do it, you’ll be pushing your horse into the stop mode rather than pulling on him. We push the horse by clucking, riding him up with our legs and softening his neck. When he assumes perfect posture, then we can let him stop. He develops great form, and the stop becomes the big reward instead of a punishment or something he starts to dread.

Maclay showdown challenges riders

Special to the Horsetrader - October 1st, 2017

SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO — It was a big equitation evening in the Blenheim Farms Indoor Arena Sept. 23. Opening ceremonies included a beautiful retirement ceremony and inception of a new Best Equitation Horse Award, the Vigo Perpetual Trophy, followed by a presentation of the Shelby Drazan Memorial Award to deserving junior rider, Juliette Joseph.

Meanwhile 38 riders prepared to ride the Jasen Shelley designed NHSAA/ASPCA Maclay Region 8 Championship course, vying for a chance to compete at the highly-anticipated ASPCA Maclay Championship.
Blenheim EquiSports hosted the NHSAA/ASPCA Maclay Region 8 Championship, one of five Regional Championships. The top placing riders from these classes, along with the three upcoming Regionals, generate the list of over 150 qualified junior riders that will take on the challenges of competing in the Alltech Arena at the CP National Horse Show in Lexington, Ky., Oct. 31-Nov. 5.

Morgans: America’s first breed

From releases and staff reports - September 1st, 2017

1709A CoverIn 1789, George Washington became the first president of the United States and the U.S. Constitution was signed into law. That same year in Springfield, Mass., a small bay colt named Figure was born. This colt was instrumental in building the new country and founded America’s original equine breed, the Morgan.

The Morgan, the first recognized horse breed in the U.S., is the official state animal of both Vermont and Massachusetts. Other breeds have claimed existence in colonial times, but only the Morgan can trace its bloodlines to a common ancestor. The Morgan has influenced other breeds, including Tennessee Walking Horses, Quarter Horses, Standardbred, and American Saddlebreds.

Next month will provide an opportunity for Californians to become better acquainted with this versatile, handsome breed as a nationwide series of open barns across the U.S. takes place on Oct. 28 — the national on the “Day of the Morgan.”

Cal reiners shine in Reining By the Bay

Special to the Horsetrader - September 1st, 2017
Paige Pastorino and Taylor Made Magnum swept both DRHA Rookie slates and took home her first trophy saddle as DRHA High Point.

Paige Pastorino and Taylor Made Magnum swept both DRHA Rookie slates and took home her first trophy saddle as DRHA High Point.

John O’Hara photo

WOODSIDE — The excitement of Reining by the Bay draws competitors away from scorching temperatures throughout the Country. The San Francisco Peninsula’s coastal fog and ocean breezes are welcomed by all. ‘Uniqueness” is the adjective most used to describe this premier event. The Bay Area’s attractions are incredible. The Horse Park is about 30 minutes south of San Francisco and just 30 minutes to the west is the quaint coast-side town of Half Moon Bay. The Horse Park itself is located next to Stanford University and the Silicon Valley and all of its offerings. With so many fantastic sites close by the Horse Park, many attendees take time to visit San Francisco, view the Golden Gate Bridge and enjoy fantastic seafood dishes at renowned restaurants. One trip to Reining by the Bay cannot cover all that the San Francisco Peninsula has to offer. NRHA Professional Martin Meuhlstaetter from Scottsdale, Arizona states “If this was an AQHA show with no money or prizes we would still attend.”

In its 18th year, paid out in excess of $250,000 in cash and prizes, ensuring its place on the Top 10 of the National Reining Horse Association’s event list.

The Lucas Oil Open Derby is one highlight of the event. The Bay Arena is 150’ wide by 300’ long, and the footing is meticulously prepared and groomed to provide the most optimal footing for tough competition.
This year, a new record for the event was achieved when NRHA 4 Million Dollar professional Andrea Fappani took a clean sweep of the Lucas Oil Level 4 Open Derby winning first, second and third on his three mounts. The palomino mare Wimpys Little Tag, Whiz N Tag Chex x Wimpys Little Chic, showed off her exceptional talent those bloodlines gave her by marking a 227.5 for owner Freddie Brasfield from Tennessee and a paycheck of $12,929.