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907668-1702A Newstrader PHOTO_A Gibson

Gibson Ranch photo

LOS ANGELES — Dale Gibson has thrown his cowboy hat into the arena as a candidate for the Los Angeles City Council, District 7 — a horse-laden area that covers the northeast section of the San Fernando Valley.

It also sits on the map of a high-speed rail proposal that, if enacted, threatens to disrupt horse ownership along the route.

Gibson, who started Gibson Ranch in Sunland along with his wife, Heather, in 1998, has a portfolio of equestrian advocacy that includes serving as current President of the Los Angeles Equine Advisory Committee. Trails, zoning and preservaton of open space have been common concerns presented by the EAC to the L.A. City Council since its inception in 2009, and Gibson says the urgency in his district for equestrian participation is stronger than ever.

“It is very clear to me that the residents of Council District 7 are ready for their voices to be heard,” said Gibson. “Ours is a diverse area, and while I was out personally collecting the signatures to qualify for the ballot, I heard firsthand the concerns.”

Wet weather woes: the hooves

By Daniel H. Grove, DVM - February 1st, 2017

AskTheVetWe’re in the middle of winter, and a recent question reached me regarding the wet weather and horses’ feet: What kind of issues do we face, and how do we avoid and treat these problems?

With the increased moisture of the season, many areas of the country see an increase in certain problems. The No. 1 problem I encounter that increases with rainy season is hoof abscesses. A hoof abscess is an area of infection that can be found most anywhere in the hoof. They can be closer to the sole or they may try to erupt in the coronary band. In these cases, they are often times called a gravel. For these abscesses, you need three things: 1. bacteria, 2. a medium for them to grow, and 3. the body’s response (pus) to the infection.

InGate graphicThe Norco Colt Starting Challenge is set for Friday, Feb. 24 from 6-9 p.m. and will continue on Saturday, Feb. 25 from 6-10 p.m. at Ingalls Park in Norco. Tickets are just $15 to attend the Colt Starting Challenge, which focuses on Natural Horsemanship and utilizes a horse’s natural instincts. The techniques used are a far cry from what was done a generation ago and what many have seen regarding breaking horses on TV and in the movies. The competitions are the brainchild of trainer and horseman Russell Beatty. In the two-day challenges, trainers are matched via random draw to horses that have had limited handling — no saddle nor bridle ever on the animal. To close out the challenge, trainers take their horse through a variety of obstacles in order to show how far their animals have come in a short amount of time. Mark your calendars and enjoy this competition. If you would like to enter a horse or purchase tickets, contact Colt Starting Challenge USA at ColtStartingChallengeUSA.com or call (808) 269-3408.

Fear: Resistance to our dreams

By Sheryl Lynde / Horsetrader columnist - February 1st, 2017

Trainer TipsA certain level of fear is healthy — we call it common sense. Fear compels us to focus, to direct our attention to the present moment while attempting to push our personal limits by bravely testing the water outside our comfort zone. However, too much fear will inhibit you from advancing your ability.

By living within your comfort zone, growth will elude you. There is never an end-destination to becoming a horseman. There will always be another personal best to achieve, another goal to reach, in order to become the rider your horse deserves. It is the ride of your life.

Worries are chronic fears. There’s fear of getting hurt, fear of getting back in the saddle after being injured, and fear of judgement by others. We have to be a watcher of our thoughts — keep your eyes on what you want to accomplish, not on what created your fear.

The Start of the Turnaround

Les Vogt for the Horsetrader - February 1st, 2017

More With Les graphicSo how do we start to teach the turnaround? We start by walking in a circle about 10 feet in diameter. You want to use your circle to establish the correct bend, so bring your circle down to where your horse’s spine is bent evenly and you can just see the corner of the horse’s eye.

Now let’s stop here and think about the difference between this forward circle and the turnaround. In the turnaround, we will want to maintain the same bend and the same cadence (or rhythm), at least at this level. We want the front legs to keep moving, we want the outside back leg to keep moving, but we just want to slow down, or even stop, the forward movement of the inside hind leg.

Proper equitation and position on the box seat

by Trish Demers | Horsetrader columnist - February 1st, 2017

The hands and contact. As a driver, there is a lot to think about. It’s not just hitching up an equine and going down the road behind the horse, holding the lines. It’s your responsibility to understand if your horse is harnessed and hitched correctly to avoid any mishaps along the way. I HOPE one of the first things you will learn is proper control of your horse through your hands and posture.

One Stop Shop & Education Too

http://bit.ly/Expolist

- January 1st, 2017

All American Horses
619-572-3087
AllAmericanHorses.org
BOOTH 9218
All American Horses provides top professonal services inNatural Horsemanship, certified training, consignment horse sales and boarding. Experienced in working with all breeds and disciplines, All American Horses prides itself on its long-lasting client relationships. The saying, “Horses are our life” rings true, as All American Horses holds national and international certifications with more than 20 years of professional experience that make a difference. Your horse will know the difference! All American Horses invites all Expo Pomona attendees to visit its booth to learn of the facility’s popular boarding and training options, as well as of its tried-and-true consignment and training program, where they tune up your horse, market it and get it sold to a good home.

Lots to Learn

- January 1st, 2017

The ‘take home’ for Expo Pomona attendees will be
lessons learned up close from the best clinicians

John and Josh Lyons are among the headliners this year, as Horse Expo Pomona continues to bring top equine experts to its stages and arenas. One ticket price gets you access to unlimited learning, whether you’re a competitor looking for an edge or a recreational rider looking for insight into your human-horse relationship.

John Lyons
One of the most respected trainers around the world, John Lyons is known as “America’s Most Trusted Horseman.” He has earned that title through 30 years of dedication to horses and horse owners. His ideas and concepts in horse training have influenced every level of performance, every style of riding and every breed of horse throughout the world, and it’s safe to say that his ideas and work have changed thousands of lives. John’s sincere regard for people and the horses they love has remained unchanged throughout his career.
John has been honored by many facets of the horse industry, including universities, breed associations, horse clubs, magazines, cities and states for his contributions and dedication to the horse and the industry, and he continues to be one of the most sought-after trainers, speakers, demonstrators and clinicians anywhere. There is hardly an expo in the country or around the world where you will not find John, his children Josh, Brandi, and Michael or one of their certified trainers as a guest clinician. John and his wife Jody live and work in Parachute, Colo., on “Our Dream Ranch.” Their door is always open to everyone and you are invited to stop by anytime.

As an older and wiser rider, I’ve sometimes struggled to stay involved with horses. I’m not so interested in showing any more (maybe western dressage some day) but I am very interested in having simple fun again, like I did when I was riding just for the joy of it, as a kid.

With that in mind, I recently purchased a Haflinger mare who looks like the perfect equine partner to help me rekindle the simple pleasure of riding I knew before life- and riding- got so complicated. Lia is compact, point-and-shoot simple to ride or drive, and she’s so cute she makes me grin every time I see her peeking through her Goldilocks blonde forelock at me.

The challenge now is to merge my busy adult life with reliving my childhood dreams. So, my New Year’s resolution for 2017 is to ride my little mare at least once a week (she’s used for lessons to get her exercise and training while I’m tending to grown-up responsibilities) and to haul out to explore a new area on horseback at lease once a month.
Happy New Year from Suzi Vlietstra and ‘Lia’ Aurelia of Genesis
–Suzi, Chino Hills

Notice anything new and different with Horsetrader?

From the Horsetrader sales staff - January 1st, 2017

InGate graphicHappy New Year! There’s nothing like opening up a new calendar and starting with a clean slate. You might have noticed some freshness when you opened this issue of the Horsetrader — the first of 2017. For one, we’ve redesigned some of the sections. The Fototrader pages — those popular horse-for-sale and trailer-for-sale color picture ads — have been relocated into the front of the magazine. This puts them on on the same pages as our other popular sale listings, our classifieds. We’ve changed the look and feel a little, too, to help readers slow down to check them out. We hope you like the changes…please let us know!