Go to FastAd#:

    Rose Parade dreams come true for California Arabian group

    Region One Versatile Arabians successfully ride in the Tournament of Roses Parade as a first-time entry

    From Horsetrader staff reports - January 21st, 2010 - General News

    Members of the Region One Versatile Arabians achieve their goal of riding in the 2010 Rose Parade.

    Courtesy of the Tournament of Roses Archives

    Members of the Region One Versatile Arabians achieve their goal of riding in the 2010 Rose Parade.

    PASADENA — The Region One Versatile Arabians was formed with hopes of riding in the 2010 Tournament of Roses Parade. They amazingly achieved their goal as a first-time entry into the granddaddy of all parades, while also showcasing the Arabian horse breed.

    Every New Year’s Day since she was a girl, Molly Jenks of Norco has raced to the television to watch the elaborate floats and equestrian groups in Pasadena’s Tournament of Roses Parade. So when Jenks learned in July 2009 that she and Rocky, her 21-year-old Arabian horse, had been accepted to participate in the 2010 New Year’s Day parade that she has idolized since childhood, it came as a shock. At her Norco ranch, Jenks, 37, explained how excited she was for her champion horse to walk in the world-famous parade among other first-rate equestrian groups.

    “It’s really an honor to be able to ride a horse that I’ve owned, raised, trained and shown for 21 years,” she said. Jenks joined Arabian horse owners from all over Southern California to form a group of 11 horses and riders for the Jan. 1, 2010 Rose Parade. The group, known as Region One Versatile Arabians, was 19th in the parade lineup and was selected out of about 42 entries from across the country to be among the 23 equestrian parade units in 2010.

    Members of the Region One Versatile Arabians achieve their goal of riding in the 2010 Rose Parade.

    Courtesy of the Tournament of Roses Archives

    Members of the Region One Versatile Arabians achieve their goal of riding in the 2010 Rose Parade.

    Region One Versatile Arabians included the following Southern Californians:

    • Nancy Harvey of Sierra Madre. She is the AHA Region One director, parade marshal for the group, an international Arabian judge, and winner of the prestigious AHA President’s Award.
    • Jan Roeder of Cowan Heights is the AHA Region One parade coordinator.
    • Nicki McGinnis of Norco is a Horsetown USA Hall of Fame trainer
    • Amanda Wood of San Juan Capistrano has been riding since she was 10, and showing in hunter/jumper.
    • Sandi Harris of Brawley breeds, trains and competes in trails and the North American Trail Conference.
    • Amanda Waterfield of Alta Loma is an active San Bernardino County Sheriff.
    • Anne Kienberger of Palos Verdes makes her second Rose Parade appearance and was a previous participant in 1997.
    • Terry Banister of Westlake has logged 2,000 AERC miles, including three 100-milers, some multi-day rides and several top-10 placings.
    • Gayle Peña of Moreno Valley has been riding since age 12, with finally realizing her dream of owning an Arabian horse at age 26.
    • Debra Duncan-Montoya of Valley Center is cancer survivor who is realizing a true dream of actually riding in the Rose Parade–this dream helped her through her darkest days of treatment for Stage IV breast cancer.
    • Molly Jenks of Norco is a horse trainer and handicapped-riding program owner and director, with currently 18 riders in her program, Quantum Therapeutic Riding.
    • Outwalkers for the group during the parade included Arabian trainer and judge Ted Lange of Whittier, and Patricia Fitchner of Norco.

    Members of the Region One Versatile Arabians achieve their goal of riding in the 2010 Rose Parade.

    Courtesy of the Tournament of Roses Archives

    Members of the Region One Versatile Arabians achieve their goal of riding in the 2010 Rose Parade.

    “This was a group that was unique in that it was all Arabian breeds and their objective was to show us the diversity of Arabians and how they were
    used,” said Justine Giles, vice chairwoman of the equestrian committee for the parade.

    Giles said the committee was impressed with the group’s application, detailing the history of the Arabian horse from its origins in the Arabian Desert to modern use at therapeutic riding schools for disabled children.

    “They have everything from an Arabian costume to a police woman. They’re interesting, and I think they drive home that the Arabian breed is multi-talented,” Giles said.

    The committee was also impressed with the group’s national championship horses, and a world-famous dancing Palomino-Arabian horse who could perform in Equestfest, the pre-Rose Parade event which showcases each year’s riding groups.

    Jenks wore a $4,500 green and gold Arabian costume to portray the history of the breed. Another horse pulled an antique riding carriage. There were also riders dressed as a cowgirl, a sheriff, and another rode sidesaddle.

    Members of the Region One Versatile Arabians achieve their goal of riding in the 2010 Rose Parade.

    Courtesy of the Tournament of Roses Archives

    Members of the Region One Versatile Arabians achieve their goal of riding in the 2010 Rose Parade.

    Group leader/marshal Nancy Harvey and other group members said they were pleasantly surprised to be selected on their first try. Other groups have been rejected repeatedly by the committee. “They assembled this group specifically for the Tournament of Roses, so they did a lot of pre-qualification for us,” Giles said. “We’re looking for animals that can perform in public without endangering the public.”

    On New Year’s Eve, members of the Region One Versatile Arabians endured a long-and-chilly night with little sleep, while camping with their horses on a closed strip of the Long Beach Freeway in Pasadena while waiting to march in the 2010 Rose Parade.

    The small section of freeway was shut off to cars, but open for Rose Parade riding groups. The Region One Versatile Arabians–along with their horses and trailers–set up camp, tossing inflatable beds and pillows onto gravel near the freeway median and created a makeshift campsite, alongside other equestrian groups just blocks from the start of the parade.

    After finishing the parade–5.5 miles and two hours of waving later–members of the Region One Versatile Arabians said it was well worth the whole process and night-before staging to make their dreams come true. “It was perfect; I never saw so many people,” Peña said. “Everybody’s arms held up from waving.”

    For information about the Region One Arabian Horse Association, visit: www.aharegionone.org

    Top 10 Tips to get into the Rose Parade: See the California Horsetrader article – CLICK HERE

    Leave a Comment

    All fields must be filled in to leave a message.