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2018 Horse Headliners

Saluting a year’s worth of highlights and heroes

- November 30th, 2018

WINTER

headliners_1_1812aTHE TRAUMA OF DECEMBER’S WILDFIRES—and subsequent mudslides a month later in some areas—was far from forgotten in communities from San Diego County to Central California. In many places, victim needs still outstripped supplies. But signs of recovery were appearing, slowly.
While the toll of the terrible trio—the Lilac Fire in Bonsall, Creek Fire in Los Angeles and Thomas Fire in Ventura County—was still being calculated, groups formed both formally and informally to mutually support and educate neighbors in respective communities.
Deer Springs Equestrian in San Marcos, a few miles due south of the Lilac Fire, conducted a two-hour equine microchip clinic on Jan. 13, where Dr. Emily Sandler of Pacific Coast Equine Veterinary Services microchipped and registered horses.
The local advocacy group, the Twin Oaks Valley Equestrian Association, sent out a comprehensive self-evacuation guide that could be a difference-maker in preparation for a future event. The guide is rooted in the Cal Fire Volunteers in Prevention campaign after the June 2008 Lightning Strike Fires in Tehama County.
In the area struck by the Creek Fire in Los Angeles, equestrians banded together to educate, plan and communicate using lessons learned from the Dec. 6 firestorm that devastated longtime equestrian centerpieces in their community like Middle Ranch and Gibson Ranch.
At Gibson Ranch, volunteers worked several months, lending skills and effort toward a common vision: the return of the horse ranch to normal.

EquestFest returns this month better than ever!

From Horsetrader sales staff - November 30th, 2018

wordpress_column_ingateThe Tournament of Roses EquestFest presented by Wells Fargo, is coming soon to the Los Angeles Equestrian Center in Burbank on Saturday, Dec. 29. Don’t miss the opportunity to be “up close and personal” with your favorite equestrian units from this year’s fabulous parade.
The very first Tournament of Roses parade took place on January 1, 1890, when Grand Marshal Francis Rowland and President Charles Holder mounted their favorite horses and led the Rose Parade through Pasadena. In 1920, the 31st Annual Rose Parade marked the end of the horse-drawn era and ushered in the innovation of motor-driven floats, powered by electric and gasoline engines. Over the years, the organizing committees have recognized and honored the horse-heritage of this great event. This year, 18 of the nearly 90 participants in the Tournament of Roses parade are equestrian.
Talented equestrians have performed many favorite and iconic roles, from pony races and chariot races, to beautiful horse-drawn carriages and horse-drawn floats. A tradition as old as the Tournament of Roses® itself, equestrian units remain an irreplaceable part of America’s New Year Celebration®. A wide variety of horse breeds entertain spectators, each with their own style and grace. Previous breeds have included Curly Horses, American Saddlebreds, Gypsy Cobs, Andalusians, Miniature Horses, Draft Horses, Quarter Horses and more.

Strangles and Biosecurity

By Daniel H. Grove, DVM - November 30th, 2018

wordpress_column_groveWe had a question come in regarding strangles. This year, the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) came out with a consensus statement on this disease. I will go over the key items discussed and the bio-security measures they recommend. These recommendations apply to any outbreak of contagious disease, although each disease may have some minor changes.
Strangles is a term used to describe a bacterial infection caused by the organism Streptococcus equi ssp equi. The common presentation is a respiratory disease with lymph node enlargement. Horses typically have a fever and severe nasal discharge. The bacteria starts to be shed in nasal secretions 2-3 days after the onset of fever and typically persists for 2-3 weeks. It is recommended that all recovered horses be treated as potentially infectious for six weeks after the resolution of purulent (pus) discharge. From 20-25 percent of horses recovering from the disease can become susceptible to a second attack of the disease. An average of 10 percent of horses will have a persistent infection in their guttural pouches, which are located in the throat area and can test positive from that area for months to years without showing outward clinical signs. These types of animals, healthy without showing signs, are thought to be more important in the spread of the disease as they are not recognized as sick.

Review and resume

By Sheryl Lynde | Horsetrader columnist - November 30th, 2018

wordpress_column_lyndeAs 2018 comes to a close, I find myself reflecting on the lessons that have stood out above the others.

They are…

Have a goal in mind and take the steps necessary to obtain that goal. “No one who achieves any level of success does so without the help of others. The wise and confident acknowledge this help with gratitude.” Alfred North Whitehead.
Without action taken to move forward, your desire to improve will remain a day dream. I have a passion for what I do, which is starting colts and working with problem horses. Because of my passion, I continue to strive for improvement to better serve the clients and horses that come to me for help and to be a better horsewoman. I look to mentors that I respect and that have proven success in the discipline I am seeking help in.

Smaller circles

By Les Vogt - November 30th, 2018

wordpress_column_lesBy now your horse should be moving along smoothly at all three gaits in your training arena. So the next thing we’re going to start doing is to ask him to become more responsive and balanced as you guide him around, and to try a few different maneuvers. We’re not really concerned with speed right now, but we do want gaits to be smooth and steady. If your horse is a little “chargey” elsewhere in this manual you’ll find ways to solve that problem.
Also, while we talk about lots of variations of the circle, you’ll want to spend a lot of time working in big circles—the size you would do in a reining pattern. In a reining class you’ll spend more time on your circles than anything else. You want your horse to guide so easily that once you put him on a circle he almost stays there on his own. We’re going to be adding speed to that circle in the future, so you want to spend time now making sure he is really comfortable in them.

Pretty in PINK

10th Annual Pink Classic brings out innovations, talent

From Horsetrader staff reports - November 2nd, 2018

DEL MAR—The 10th Annual Pink Classic Championships came to Showpark Oct. 18-21, bringing the seaside venue to life with an all-breed show that kept multiple arenas humming.

Birdie Avery and her Talley have moved over to ranch riding, where they earned four AQHA points and qualified for the AQHA World Show Oct. 18-21 at the All-Breed Western Horse Show in Del Mar. Horsetrader photo

Birdie Avery and her Talley have moved over to ranch riding, where they earned four AQHA points and qualified for the AQHA World Show Oct. 18-21 at the All-Breed Western Horse Show in Del Mar. Horsetrader photo

Held every October, this cancer-awareness horse event featured signs throughout the venue that displayed cancer facts and statistics, emphasizing early detection. Pink Bandanas and wrist bands were free to exhibitors and spectators—pink wristbands symbolizing support and white wristbands for cancer survivors.

Ranch horse versatility classes have created a wave of interest, says show manager Poncie Hermann-Gimple, because they offer an opportunity to compete with your horse without the expense of an expensive show tack and outfits, and also becasue of a better sense of camaraderie that stems from a more level playing field due to the difficulty of patterns. Show management is allowed to draw and present original patterns that have not been seen prior to the show.

New this year was the High Point Ranch Horse, with the champion receiving the Emily Jungers Perpetual Mel Lawson Trophy. Emily, who succumbed to cancer nine years ago, was on the Track One Events staff many years.

The horses competed in ranch riding, ranch trail, ranch on the rail, and conformation at halter.

LANCASTER—Many folks told Madison Fay Wagner this would not be a good year for her to run for the Miss California Rodeo title. At 19, they said, she was too young—most candidates are in their 20s—and they also told her there were too many other strong candidates.

But the Valley Center native stuck to her plan and not only ran, she won the coveted title.

“I was told that I didn’t have a chance,” says Wagner, who became eligible for the pagent last spring when she was named queen of the Valley Center PRCA Rodeo. “I took this as incentive to ride even more, study even harder, and practice, practice, practice. While advice is well-intentioned, it can also be misplaced. Have confidence in your ability and don’t underestimate yourself.”

Del Mar Int’l Show features year-enders

From Horsetrader staff reports - November 2nd, 2018

DEL MAR—The Del Mar International swept through the Del Mar Fairgrounds three consecutive weekends in October, showcasing a spectrum of talent vying for series awards and medal finals.

Avery Kalafatas and Benetton were winners in the Onondarka Medal Finals. Amy McCool photo

Avery Kalafatas and Benetton were winners in the Onondarka Medal Finals. Amy McCool photo

One of the highlights was the Oct. 21 $25,000 GGT Footing Grand Prix Series Final, presented by California Horsetrader and horsetrader.com. Eduardo Mendes took the final, but Kristiin Hardin ended the year as the GGT Series CHampions.

Menezes couldn’t say enough good things about the 15-year-old chestnut Warmblood gelding owned by Carlos Hank.

Coming in second was Mandy Porter on Pasilla, an 11-year-old grey Swedish Warmblood mare owned by Sarah Ballou.

SAN MARCOS—The City of San Marcos has a new mounted ranger, Cortney Pache, patrolling its extensive trails system, and she is looking for volunteers.

Cortney Pache

Cortney Pache

Mounted patrol volunteers are sought in order to assist the City by providing safe and enjoyable trail use for park visitors and the community. Applicants must be an experienced rider aged 18 or higher, have their own or have reasonable access to an equine in good condition and sound health, and be able to get to Walnut Grove Equestrian Park or Double Peak Park and its surrounding trails.

Horses have some guidelines to meet, too, and they are available online at: san-marcos.net/outdooradventures.

An affair in Horsetown USA

From Horsetrader staff reports - November 2nd, 2018

Andrea Kaus photo

Andrea Kaus photo

NORCO—From the mounted shooting to carriage driving—and everything in-between, it seemed—the Second Annual Norco Horse Affair brought Ingalls Park Equestrian Center to life Oct. 5-7. Presented by The Thrifty Horse Consignment Shoppe, the event drew attendees from throughout Southern California to enjoy three days of seminars, entertainment and shopping the wares of more than 35 vendors.

More online: http://bit.ly/811_Norco