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Finding your Social Distance

- April 1st, 2020

Appreciation for horses only grows when humans have to stay six feet apart


Angel, my Arabian mare, seems to ponder the long road back to normal. She completed her first 100-mile race a couple years ago in endurance and has always finished in the Top Ten. She is now retired, living and riding these trails on the Ortega. The horse of a lifetime.

–Jill McGovern, Capistrano Beach


Learning a new style of riding in Ione.

The young lady in the mask is from Germany, where she rides English. She’s the niece of a friend, and she’s riding my retired bridle horse, “Reese,” and getting the feel of a Californio-style cow horse. I’m on my two-rein youngster. Even with the light rain that was falling during our ride, it was a good day. (BTW…her aunt, the photographer, was “masked up” also!)

–Peter Taylor, Ione

Bio-security in pandemic times

- April 1st, 2020

By Daniel H. Grove, DVM

Los Angeles Equestrian Center photo

The COVID-19 global pandemic has bio-security on everyone’s minds. Let’s revisit biosecurity and you may appreciate similarities between some of the recommendations here for your horse and the ones we are receiving now from the government for ourselves during this outbreak.

First off, make sure you are up to date on your horse’s vaccines. Vaccines are designed to help the body fight off an infectious agent if it comes into contact with it. They usually require 10 to 14 days to work. The body is exposed to the antigen and has two ways it can work to fight it off: The first is to develop antibodies; the second is what is called “cell mediated immunity.” Different vaccines have different protocols to follow for them to be their most efficacious, so either read the full label or have your veterinarian perform the series properly so they are able to give you the best protection possible.

Human-horse connections

- April 1st, 2020

By Sheryl Lynde | Horsetrader columnist

Anything of value we treat with the utmost care. Well, I’m about to tell you a story that has tremendous value, to the American Mustang and to our veterans who have served our country…and to our society as a whole.

My only hope is that I give the story the justice it deserves. (I will do my best.)

This is not a tragedy, it is a story of resilience, purpose and connection — a human-horse connection.

Reining and shining

- April 1st, 2020

WCRHA season-opener is a delightful event

By Eileen Maxinoski

It was a triumphant return to the arena for Hanna Hopper and her gelding “Superboy”, who won three non-pro championships and tied for another.

CORNING — The West Coast Reining Horse Association started its 2020 season with a bang March 6-8 at the Rolling Hills Equestrian Center, as a record number of entrants showed their reiners for judges Janette Dublin from Texas and Cyndi Robbins from Oklahoma.

Overall, weather was sunny with scattered clouds during the four days, but on Saturday evening a thunderstorm hit — with a breathtaking double-rainbow over the equestrian facility.

Let’s ride this out!

- March 19th, 2020

Horse tips during COVID-19 concerns

The outside of a horse is good for the inside of a horseperson.

So, how do we spend the period (weeks?, months?) between now and the end of the COVID-19 viral scare?

From top to bottom, the COVID-19 crisis has affected all aspects of our local horse communities. Someday — hopefully later this spring — the gauntlet of rules and quarantines will pass, allowing us to return to our untethered equestrian lives. Those who are fortunate enough to be healthy but who may have a hiatus from work, school or other obligations because of lay-offs and closures — your horse is there.

California is a big state with a variety of restrictions, so please check with local government constraints during the quarantine. For example, seven counties in Northern California have “shelter in place” orders from the State. Other counties have no reports of confirmed cases.

Having said that, here are some tips for equestrians:

Gatherings

Bans on all gatherings of more than 10 people remain in effect. This means that any event larger than 10 people (e.g. horse shows, clinics, larger trail rides, conferences, etc.) are against federal recommendations, and in some areas, local laws.

Equine Related Injuries – ERs and Hospitals

During this time, exercise extreme caution in your own equine activities. Think twice about doing anything that might increase your risk of injury. The state continues to face shortages in the medical community, including reduced inpatient beds, availability of doctors, and sterile medical environments free of possible COVID-19 contamination. Trips to the ER increase your risk of contracting disease, and you may also be taking up medical resources that are needed by very sick people.

Social Distancing for Stables – Best Practices

The CDC and WHO also suggest the practice of social distancing. This should apply to all activities including equestrian activities at your farms, barns, and other agricultural buildings. Please ensure:

  1. A minimum space barrier of 6 feet between yourself and other people at all times. (e.g. no giving leg ups, no riding side by side, etc.)
  2. No more than 10 people in an area or present at an activity at one time.
  3. Sanitization of all common surfaces, supplies, and other items.

IMPORTANT NOTE: A person CAN contract COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it. The virus can survive from several hours up to a week on surfaces, depending on the type of surface, and the temperature and humidity. https://www.prevention.com/health/a31405079/how-long-does-coronavirus-live-on-surfaces/

These objects found in and around your farms include but are not limited to:

  1. Tack and Apparel: Bridles, Saddles, Girths, Saddle Pads, Wraps, Helmets, Boots, and all other Leather and Cloth items.
  2. Communal Barn Supplies: Pitch forks, Wheelbarrows, Hoses, Grooming equipment, etc.
  3. Rest room, tack room, feed room door knobs, light switches, etc.

We strongly advise you consider this when making decisions to continue your lesson programs and invite individuals including boarders to your facilities. You can find a list of disinfectant products that are effective in killing the COVID-19 virus here: https://www.epa.gov/pesticide-registration/list-n-disinfectants-use-against-sars-cov-2

Business Insurance – Loss of Income Clauses

If you own a business and are or expect to suffer a significant loss of revenue, we encourage you to check your business insurance policy for loss of income clauses and any recourse during a declared national or state of emergency.

Horse Care & Welfare – Available Resources

Finally, all members of California’s wide equestrian community should be thinking about how we can be prepared to help our fellow equestrians and their horses as the economic impact of the pandemic widens and is felt locally. If owners can no longer afford to care for their horses, contact association leadership and horse rescue operators for suggestions and options — before horses become abandoned or go without hay or feed.

If you have helpful information or news to share, please send to news@horsetrader.com so we can post it on our online newspage and also on our Facebook and Instagram pages.

Sweetheart of a Reining

- March 3rd, 2020

CRHA 2020 season kicks off
at LAEC

Special to the Horsetrader

Faith Rankin is a study of focus as she takes Ima Rowdy Chic through a pattern at the California Reining Horse Association’s Sweetheart Reining, Jan. 31-Feb. 2 at the Los Angeles Equestrian Center.

BURBANK—The love of reining is a strong one, and that was evident as the California Reining Horse Association launched its 2020 season with the Sweetheart Reining Show.

Held Jan. 30-Feb. 2 at the Los Angeles Equestrian Center, the competition this year complimented its full CRHA slate with NRHA Affiliate Qualifier classes as well as AQHA, PCHA and Jack & Linda Baker Qualifier classes. Also, the CRHA shows feature ranch riding classes, hosted by the association’s Youth Club, which directly receives the proceeds.

Vet visit, then meds

- March 3rd, 2020

By Daniel H. Grove, DVM

Here is a question that can be a point of contention between many veterinarians and their clients:

“Why does my veterinarian need to see that before I get medication? This is a simple problem, and I just need the medication.”

Ask the Vet

Let us take a look at why it is necessary for a patient to first be seen before dispensing or prescribing medication.

I will start with the client’s point of view. The client may be a very experienced horse person who has been doing this for 30-plus years. They have a minor cut on the horse that they are comfortable cleaning and wrapping to allow it to heal. They have had the veterinarian out for 10 of these in the past and the treatment is always the same: put them on some antibiotics, give them some bute and give a tetanus shot. Why can’t they just pick up some antibiotics and treat the horse without the expense of the veterinarian seeing the horse?

From Horsetrader sales staff

The Burbank Showcase Multi Breed Horse Show will again bring the Los Angeles Equestrian Center to life April 22-26. Fast becoming one of the largest multi-breed horse shows on the West Coast (if not the largest!), it will again benefit the fight against cancer. Proceeds will go to Fiesta Spanish Horse 501(c)3, a non-profit dedicated to donations for cancer research entities. Burbank Showcase celebrates a full spectrum of horse breeds and disciplines, including but not limited to American Saddlebred, Andalusian, Friesian, Gypsy, Lusitano and Mustang, with a variety of events that will include open Dressage, Cowboy Dressage (new this year!), USEF English and Western Pleasure Classes and Working Equitation. Also new this year will be the Open Driving Show, recognized by the American Driving Society, and also a special new Showcase Area to show off each of the breeds.

The five-day horse show will have something for everyone, even special open classes for horses not registered in any of the above breeds. Last year’s event had close to 300 show horses. Food, drink and various other vendors will be available throughout the weekend. Burbank Showcase Horse Show has something for everyone, and admission is free to the public. Last year, a steady stream of public spectators attended throughout the duration of the event.

Seek your horse’s purpose

- March 3rd, 2020

By Sheryl Lynde | Horsetrader columnist

Studies show that one third of the people asked about their job will tell you that they hate it. Two thirds of people will tell you that they feel a lack of purpose or fulfillment. They feel that their job is not a good fit for them even though they are great at performing the tasks of their position and are financially successful.

We spend 40 percent of our lives working. Abraham Maslow, author and American psychologist, created a hierarchy of needs he felt were essential in order for us to feel a sense of contentment in our lives. At the bottom of the list is the first level that is concerned with our physiological needs. These needs determine your ability to provide for your basic demands for survival and safety, such as shelter, food, etc.. At the top of the list is self-actualization, which refers to the ability to realize, grow and contribute whatever your innate gifts or skills that you possess. To be authentic, to bloom or realize your full potential, self actualization is a critical component to your sense of belonging and your self worth.

The Silver Artistry of Jon Peters

- February 5th, 2020

This San Diego surfer has emerged as one of the West’s most creative makers.

By William Reynolds | Reprint from Western Horseman magazine

Photo courtesy Jon Peters

The diversity of creative inspiration in the West is as wide open as its geography. And in today’s world of the cowboy crafts, San Diego silversmith Jon Peters exemplifies this creative openness. From finely engraved cinch rings, bits and spurs to mustache combs, tooled leather and saddle silver, some may call Peters a “problem solver artisan.”

Growing up Southern California’s Orange County, Jon found that school was very trying on him. He hated being “locked up in a room,” as he called it. In high school it was determined he suffered from dyslexia, a learning disorder that made reading difficult for him. Away from school he surfed the many great breaks along the California coast and did part-time work on ranches east of San Diego. He had a grand childhood growing up with a father and grandfather who were both mechanics and helped him learn the ways of tools, tool making and generally how to fix things. He found that if he were shown how to do something, he would catch on quickly and figure the best ways for him to work further.