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Fluidity: From exercises 3 to 4

By LES VOGT - Horsetrader columnist - April 3rd, 2014

64th in a series
After learning hip control details last issue, we look in detail in issues ahead on developing cues.

Moving the hips: Going next level

By LES VOGT - Horsetrader columnist - March 20th, 2014

63rd in a series
This issue, Les guides us into the detail of controlling the horse’s hip.

Having control of the horse’s hip is critical for accurate lope departures and lead changes, in addition to helping you maintain proper alignment. If you see a horse missing leads, or dropping a lead in back (when a horse changes leads with his front legs but not his back), it’s a pretty good indication that the horse needs more work on hip control.

Moving the ribs: Going next level

By LES VOGT - Horsetrader columnist - March 6th, 2014

62nd in a series
Les introduced us last issue to exercises 3 and 4. Here are details for exercise 3.

‘Control the whole body’ exercises

By LES VOGT - Horsetrader columnist - February 20th, 2014

61st in a series
Last issue, Les wrapped up collected stops. Now we’ll move into exercises Number 3 & Number 4. Here’s an overview before we move into more details in our March 6 issue.

Being able to control the horse’s whole body is critical to your training. In particular there are times when you’ll need to position or move the horse’s body without the shoulders leading the way or getting in the way. Here are a few:

Collected stops: A quick wrap-up

By LES VOGT - Horsetrader columnist - February 6th, 2014

60th in a series
Last issue, Les concluded his in-depth series on collected stops. Before we move on to exercises next issue, let’s recap the collected stop material.

More on big stops: ‘After the signal stop’

By LES VOGT - Horsetrader columnist - January 16th, 2014

59th in a series
Last issue, Les presented his “Seven Steps to Big Stops”, and he worked us through the “Signal Stop”. (to review: http://bit.ly/1401A_Les). Now, we apply those keys with different stops.

7 steps to big stops: Condition to whoa

By LES VOGT - Horsetrader columnist - January 2nd, 2014

58th in a series
Last issue, Les showed us ‘the sequence stop’. Now we’ll launch into his seven-step ‘big stop’ program.

Three exercise stages: Walk, trot and lope

By LES VOGT - Horsetrader columnist - December 19th, 2013

57th in a series
Last issue, Les showed us details of collected stops. Now we take into account the gait.

Three Stages: Walk, Trot and Lope
So is a horse that just did his first great collected stop at the walk ready to go on to the lope? I don’t think so, maybe not even to a trot yet. There’s work to be done but only perfect stuff. To get the perfect stuff it’ll seem like you’re spending a lot of time doing exercises that don’t seem really exciting or fun – you don’t see the light at the end of the tunnel – but as you continue to work on the fundamentals, the stops will start to happen right before you, and they’ll stay consistent because both you and your horse will be comfortable. Don’t worry – it happens.

Collected stops: 2 things you DON’T want

By LES VOGT - Horsetrader columnist - December 5th, 2013

56th in a series
Last issue, Les prepared us well as we head into collected stops. Here are a few more pointers.

When you are ready for the stop and you take away your legs, don’t say “whoa.” We don’t want a crisp hard stop yet. We want a beautiful energy transfer from the front of the horse to the back, one that just melts. What you are going to feel when it’s right is that there is actually an energy current that goes from his poll, down his spine and to his hind legs. You can stop a little harder but don’t say “whoa” at this point; you’re letting him melt, and saying “whoa” means “get it into the ground.”

Magic feeling: A good collected stop

By LES VOGT - Horsetrader columnist - November 21st, 2013

55th in a series
After Les broke down the components of a collected stop in last issue, here he presents keys to remember.