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Double Trouble

- May 1st, 2019

Nicole Haunert dominates early Markel series grand prix

Special to the Horsetrader

Rider Nicole Haunert, here on winner Concolue, took first and second at the April 13 $25,000 Markel Insurance Grand Prix. (Amy McCool photo)

SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO—An enthusiastic crowd enjoyed a beautiful Southern California afternoon, cheering on 19 entries at the April 13 $25,000 Markel Insurance Grand Prix. After five went clear and advanced to the jump-off, Nicole Haunert and Concolue, owned by Cherokee Show Horses Inc., topped the field. Making the day extra special, she also placed second aboard Jamaico Drum van de Breepoel, owned by NJK Show Jumpers.

The Ranch Riding rage

- April 1st, 2019

More classes, more riders…more fun!

Cheryl Harmon and her Shootnroosters won the popular Amateur Ranch Riding classes at the Southern California Reined Cow Horse show March 15-18 in Temecula. (Danger Dingo photo)

If a horse show class list has the word “ranch” in it, chances are that it has a growing number of entries.

There are five different ranch riding classes now sanctioned by the American Quarter Horse Association, and they are frequently among the most popular at Southern California western shows.

The explosion in popularity has multiple causes, not the least of which is that ranch riding rewards a solid, well-broke horse that shows most suitable for getting the job done on a working ranch—a horse that rides and works with purpose.

Horse Vacations

- March 1st, 2019

Here are some destinations when you want to escape from everything except horses

Coffee Creek Ranch
Trinity Center, Calif.
(800) 624-4480
coffeecreekranch.com

This 367-acre guest ranch is nestled in the Trinity Alps Wilderness Area of Northern California.  Coffee Creek, an excellent fly-fishing stream, runs wild year-round for a half-mile through the ranch where you can pan for gold, tube and fish.

Hearty breakfasts are served in the ranch house or out on the trail, as well as poolside lunches and western barbecues under the stars!  Coffee Creek’s professional chefs prepare all your meals from garden-to-table.

Specially-designed Summer Youth Programs are offered from June 9 to Aug. 24, with great savings at the beginning and end of summer. Programs include Bronc Busters teens 13-17; Junior Wranglers 6-12; Cowboys & Cowgirls 3-5 have special pony rides, and a Kiddie Korral for those under 3 is FREE. Wilderness pack trips are also offered. See ad on page 24


Leaders of the Pack

- February 1st, 2019

What better way to spotlight trails than do the one thing that can preserve them: Ride them?!

Rebekah Wan and Jack, her Mangalarga Paulista trail horse from Brazil. (Courtesy photo)

By Horsetrader staff

NORCO—It’s a Friday afternoon, and Mike Williams returns home to Fourth Street with his 16.1-hand Mustang gelding, Cowboy, after a day of what he loves most—trail riding.

This breezy January ride went 20 miles, a perfect distance to get Cowboy ready for an upcoming 300-mile journey that he and others have been planning for more than a year. The three-week trip, leaving Norco April 30 and arriving at Bishop May 21, will take Williams and co-riders Rebekah Wan and Ray Spence along urban routes out of Horsetown USA, up and beyond the Cajon Pass, across the Mojave Desert and ultimately into Owens Valley along the Eastern Sierra.

Up to the Challenge

CRHA reiners wrap up 2018 at L.A. Equestrian Center

Special to the Horsetrader - December 28th, 2018

With three non-pro titles, Kristin Booth and Babys Got Blue Eyes were stars at the CRHA Challenge.

With three non-pro titles, Kristin Booth and Babys Got Blue Eyes were stars at the CRHA Challenge. (John O’Hara photo)

BURBANK—Each year, the California Reining Horse Association puts on “the show of shows” of the West Coast, and this year was no different when the CRHA Challenge lit up the Los Angeles Equestrian Center Oct. 24-28.

Southern California’s biggest reining competition drew top horses and riders from throughout California, Arizona, and Nevada. Coming away with special awards this year were Charmain Sauro, who rode Zins Rowdy Whiz to the CRHA Reiner of the Year Award; Rex Ross, recipient of the Rick Flathers Sportsmanship Award; Marilyn Scheffers, who rode Gunna Juice You to the Gatolotto Memorial Buckle; and Allison Williams who took home a trailer as well as the Rebecca Goss Memorial Trophy after the duo swept the CRHA and NRHA Rookie Level 2 events.
Setting this show apart from CRHA’s other shows is the number of aged events available to competitors.

Friday night saw tough competition in the Yellowstone Non Pro Derby. Kristen Booth swept the Level 4, 3, and 2 Non Pro Derby with a massive score of 149.5 aboard Kristin L Kutchuk’s Baby’s Got Blue Eyes. Brook Boyle, aboard Barbi and Michael Boyle’s Sunset Nite claimed second in the Level 4 and 3, only one point behind Booth. The Level 1 Non Pro Derby also saw big scores with Maria Danieli-Krueger taking the with with a score of 147 aboard Equestrian Properties’ Shining On Spooks.

2018 Horse Headliners

Saluting a year’s worth of highlights and heroes

- November 30th, 2018

WINTER

headliners_1_1812aTHE TRAUMA OF DECEMBER’S WILDFIRES—and subsequent mudslides a month later in some areas—was far from forgotten in communities from San Diego County to Central California. In many places, victim needs still outstripped supplies. But signs of recovery were appearing, slowly.
While the toll of the terrible trio—the Lilac Fire in Bonsall, Creek Fire in Los Angeles and Thomas Fire in Ventura County—was still being calculated, groups formed both formally and informally to mutually support and educate neighbors in respective communities.
Deer Springs Equestrian in San Marcos, a few miles due south of the Lilac Fire, conducted a two-hour equine microchip clinic on Jan. 13, where Dr. Emily Sandler of Pacific Coast Equine Veterinary Services microchipped and registered horses.
The local advocacy group, the Twin Oaks Valley Equestrian Association, sent out a comprehensive self-evacuation guide that could be a difference-maker in preparation for a future event. The guide is rooted in the Cal Fire Volunteers in Prevention campaign after the June 2008 Lightning Strike Fires in Tehama County.
In the area struck by the Creek Fire in Los Angeles, equestrians banded together to educate, plan and communicate using lessons learned from the Dec. 6 firestorm that devastated longtime equestrian centerpieces in their community like Middle Ranch and Gibson Ranch.
At Gibson Ranch, volunteers worked several months, lending skills and effort toward a common vision: the return of the horse ranch to normal.

The Norco Experience

Take a ride with a hometown author through Horsetown USA

By Audrey Pavia | for the Horsetrader - October 4th, 2018

EDITOR’S NOTE: Longtime Norco resident Audrey Pavia, an award-winning author and avid horsewoman, shares a slice of life in her beloved community by taking us on one of her favorite routes.

Norco residents pose for a 2013 community photo by photographer Brigitte Jouxtel at Pike’s Peak Park to commemorate an iconic Pedley Field Photo taken 15 years earlier.

Norco residents pose for a 2013 community photo by photographer Brigitte Jouxtel at Pike’s Peak Park to commemorate an iconic Pedley Field Photo taken 15 years earlier.

Brigitte Jouxtel photo

The sun is hanging low in the sky, and the gentle afternoon breeze has arrived. It’s time to saddle up my Spanish Mustang, Milagro, and go for a ride through Norco.

I step outside my back door and Milagro whinnies to me. He knows the drill. I saddle him up and lead him to the front yard. We pick up the trail right across the street from my house. That’s how easy it is to go riding in Norco.

We head south on the Hillside Avenue trail, passing an assortment of paddocks and driveways. Milagro takes a good look at a peacock perched on a fence in a nearby yard. He’s familiar with the flock of feral peacocks that live on this part of Hillside. He then glances up at a yard across the street, where a few alpacas, a miniature horse and two Haflingers are sharing their dinner. There’s always something interesting to see in Norco.

The trail curves and we are on Third Street, headed toward Norco High School. We cross third and walk along the narrow dirt shoulder skirting the high school football field. The field is quiet today, and we pass without incident, turning right on Second Street. This is the way we need to go if we want to pass our first landmark for the ride: Disney’s Circle D Ranch.

10 tips to tame the Bureaucracy

Lessons learned in getting important issues achieved at agencies

By LYNN BROWN / for the Horsetrader - August 31st, 2018

1809a_coverEDITOR’S NOTE: Los Angeles horsewoman Lynn Brown has been a leading activist for equestrians for decades, helping horse groups navigate unfamiliar terrain of municipal government when important issues arise. Most recently, she worked with friends to successfully oppose a land use proposal in the Burbank-Glendale area that, if passed, would have replaced a legacy stable with condominiums.

The adage, “you can’t fight City Hall,” is not true—you can! Some may try and find that the cards seem stacked against them, or that the opposition was better organized. I’d like to provide some suggestions that have worked—and now is the time. These days, preserving equestrian life in many communities requires that its horsepeople to take up the fight.

The first challenge is to be positive, to know you can make a difference. It’s not always easy. In our recent battle to preserve the Silver Spur Stables from being demolished and rebuilt as small-lot housing, the task at first seemed impossible. We tackled it anyway, and to our surprise, we won—the individual who had applied to Glendale City Council for a zoning change, suddenly after months of relentless opposition, withdrew his request. If he had been successful in obtaining the zoning change, it would spell the end of all the historic boarding barns and feed stores along Riverside Drive.

NSHA Futurity Week moves to Las Vegas

New venue, new sponsors and new energy greet tradition of the cow horse way

Special to the Horsetrader - August 8th, 2018

1808a_coverLAS VEGAS, Nev.—There’s deeply rooted tradition in the discipline of reined cow horse, and the horsemen and horsewomen preparing for fall aged events will surely abide by the time-honored techniques and practices that make this sport so beloved.

But innovation surrounds the events that showcase these horses, and no one has been more leading-edge than the National Stock Horse Association, which is moving its signature event from Paso Robles to Las Vegas this year.

South Point Hotel and Casino, designed and built with equestrians in mind, will host the 2018 NSHA Futurity, Derby and World’s Richest Stock Horse competition Aug. 21-26. It will be the first time this event, which began decades ago as a summer coming out party for trainers to show their 3-year-old prospects before the venerable National Reined Cow Horse Association Snaffle Bit Futurity, takes place outside California—the cradle of reined cow horse. The NRCHA moved its World Championship Snaffle Bit Futurity to Fort Worth, Texas, last year.

Reiner Shine

CRHA talent converges on LAEC for weekend of top competition

Special to the Horsetrader - July 1st, 2018

1807A CoverBURBANK — Under a cloudless sky, the Reiner Shine horse show at the Los Angeles Equestrian Center on June 8-10 brought together some of Southern California’s best reining horses and riders.

The event, put on by the California Reining Horse Association, marked the second opportunity for competitors to qualify for the National Reining Horse Association Futurity later this year in Oklahoma.

Riding her Gunna Juice You, Marilyn Scheffers marked a 72.5 and swept the NRHA Non Pro and Intermediate Non Pro classes in a Saturday highlight. Close on her heels with a 72 was Allison Williams riding her RickyCacInHollywood. Williams placed second behind Scheffers in the NRHA Non Pro.