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Committed to a Comeback

- June 2nd, 2020

Leaders of California’s associations and facilities are prepping to relaunch show seasons

Melissa Brandes
Blenheim EquiSports

First and foremost, we want to ensure that we welcome our exhibitors to the safest environment we can possibly achieve by thoughtfully and thoroughly working with local, state, federal and USEF guidelines to put the necessary protocols in place. Once that has been achieved, we have to make sure that we have a smooth implementation of the current practices, allowing for the level of competition to stay intact and providing an enjoyable experience to those who attend.

We’ve worked with local, state. federal and USEF guidelines, health expert consultants, as well as collaborating with other managers, in order to compile the proposed plan. We are diligently creating implementation procedures, to make our return smooth and seamless, as we all adjust to the “new normal”. We have come to understand this is a fluid situation, with new discoveries and information emerging on a daily basis. We have worked together as a team at Blenheim EquiSports for over 20 years and we are committed to the sport, our exhibitors and our staff, and can’t wait to welcome everyone to our home. We have taken this challenging time to think outside the box, find solutions and remember what it is that binds us together — our love for horses.

Reining and shining

- April 1st, 2020

WCRHA season-opener is a delightful event

By Eileen Maxinoski

It was a triumphant return to the arena for Hanna Hopper and her gelding “Superboy”, who won three non-pro championships and tied for another.

CORNING — The West Coast Reining Horse Association started its 2020 season with a bang March 6-8 at the Rolling Hills Equestrian Center, as a record number of entrants showed their reiners for judges Janette Dublin from Texas and Cyndi Robbins from Oklahoma.

Overall, weather was sunny with scattered clouds during the four days, but on Saturday evening a thunderstorm hit — with a breathtaking double-rainbow over the equestrian facility.

Let’s ride this out!

- March 19th, 2020

Horse tips during COVID-19 concerns

The outside of a horse is good for the inside of a horseperson.

So, how do we spend the period (weeks?, months?) between now and the end of the COVID-19 viral scare?

From top to bottom, the COVID-19 crisis has affected all aspects of our local horse communities. Someday — hopefully later this spring — the gauntlet of rules and quarantines will pass, allowing us to return to our untethered equestrian lives. Those who are fortunate enough to be healthy but who may have a hiatus from work, school or other obligations because of lay-offs and closures — your horse is there.

California is a big state with a variety of restrictions, so please check with local government constraints during the quarantine. For example, seven counties in Northern California have “shelter in place” orders from the State. Other counties have no reports of confirmed cases.

Having said that, here are some tips for equestrians:

Gatherings

Bans on all gatherings of more than 10 people remain in effect. This means that any event larger than 10 people (e.g. horse shows, clinics, larger trail rides, conferences, etc.) are against federal recommendations, and in some areas, local laws.

Equine Related Injuries – ERs and Hospitals

During this time, exercise extreme caution in your own equine activities. Think twice about doing anything that might increase your risk of injury. The state continues to face shortages in the medical community, including reduced inpatient beds, availability of doctors, and sterile medical environments free of possible COVID-19 contamination. Trips to the ER increase your risk of contracting disease, and you may also be taking up medical resources that are needed by very sick people.

Social Distancing for Stables – Best Practices

The CDC and WHO also suggest the practice of social distancing. This should apply to all activities including equestrian activities at your farms, barns, and other agricultural buildings. Please ensure:

  1. A minimum space barrier of 6 feet between yourself and other people at all times. (e.g. no giving leg ups, no riding side by side, etc.)
  2. No more than 10 people in an area or present at an activity at one time.
  3. Sanitization of all common surfaces, supplies, and other items.

IMPORTANT NOTE: A person CAN contract COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it. The virus can survive from several hours up to a week on surfaces, depending on the type of surface, and the temperature and humidity. https://www.prevention.com/health/a31405079/how-long-does-coronavirus-live-on-surfaces/

These objects found in and around your farms include but are not limited to:

  1. Tack and Apparel: Bridles, Saddles, Girths, Saddle Pads, Wraps, Helmets, Boots, and all other Leather and Cloth items.
  2. Communal Barn Supplies: Pitch forks, Wheelbarrows, Hoses, Grooming equipment, etc.
  3. Rest room, tack room, feed room door knobs, light switches, etc.

We strongly advise you consider this when making decisions to continue your lesson programs and invite individuals including boarders to your facilities. You can find a list of disinfectant products that are effective in killing the COVID-19 virus here: https://www.epa.gov/pesticide-registration/list-n-disinfectants-use-against-sars-cov-2

Business Insurance – Loss of Income Clauses

If you own a business and are or expect to suffer a significant loss of revenue, we encourage you to check your business insurance policy for loss of income clauses and any recourse during a declared national or state of emergency.

Horse Care & Welfare – Available Resources

Finally, all members of California’s wide equestrian community should be thinking about how we can be prepared to help our fellow equestrians and their horses as the economic impact of the pandemic widens and is felt locally. If owners can no longer afford to care for their horses, contact association leadership and horse rescue operators for suggestions and options — before horses become abandoned or go without hay or feed.

If you have helpful information or news to share, please send to news@horsetrader.com so we can post it on our online newspage and also on our Facebook and Instagram pages.

Sweetheart of a Reining

- March 3rd, 2020

CRHA 2020 season kicks off
at LAEC

Special to the Horsetrader

Faith Rankin is a study of focus as she takes Ima Rowdy Chic through a pattern at the California Reining Horse Association’s Sweetheart Reining, Jan. 31-Feb. 2 at the Los Angeles Equestrian Center.

BURBANK—The love of reining is a strong one, and that was evident as the California Reining Horse Association launched its 2020 season with the Sweetheart Reining Show.

Held Jan. 30-Feb. 2 at the Los Angeles Equestrian Center, the competition this year complimented its full CRHA slate with NRHA Affiliate Qualifier classes as well as AQHA, PCHA and Jack & Linda Baker Qualifier classes. Also, the CRHA shows feature ranch riding classes, hosted by the association’s Youth Club, which directly receives the proceeds.

Season starter

- February 5th, 2020

SCRCHA opens 2020 at Tucalota Creek Ranch

Special to the Horsetrader

Little Morias Bet, ridden by Jason Grimshaw for owner Lauren Boychuk, edged Nicolas Barthelemy on Purr D Metallic by a half-point in Junior Working Cow Horse competition. (Danger Dingo photo)

TEMECULA—The Southern California Reined Cow Horse Association “kicked off” its 2020 show season Jan. 10-12 at Tucalota Creek Ranch, showcasing the new venue as well as its talented member riders and horses.

WCRHA honors its best of 2019

- February 5th, 2020
Marion Walker (center) is named the recipient of the 2019 West Coast Reining Horse Association’s Kathryn Cagle “Inspire Me” Award at the Jan. 18 banquet. The 82-year-old Walker also received the 2019 Dick Randall Horseman of the Year award. (John O’Hara photos)

RANCHO MURIETA—The West Coast Reining Horse Association held its 2019 Year End Awards Banquet and general meeting on Jan.18 at the beautiful, Western-decorated Murieta Hotel and Spa, with more than 160 members and guests attending.

Justin Wright, NRCHA Million Dollar Rider

SANTA MARIA—Justin Wright’s 17-year journey as part of the National Reined Cow Horse Association’s competitive circuit has reached a benchmark as the NRCHA’s newest One Million Dollar Rider.

The 33-year-old native California trainer has come a long way.

Ready for the Challenge

- January 3rd, 2020
Casey Bibbs on Spooks For The Chics takes CRHA Reiner of the Year crown. (Mark Blakley photo)

BURBANK—The California Reining Horse Association saw its largest Challenge Horse Show in recent memory. Approximately 330 stalls were sold with many of those spaces filled with horses from out of state. The prestigious futurity and last derby of the year brought the competition out.

The show has garnered the reputation of hosting one of the premier futurities on the West Coast. Through the years, many of the top horses made famous at the NRHA Futurity were seen showing in the Burbank class first. This year was no exception. Martin Muehlstaetter won the L4 division on Seven On Seven owned by Anne Solbraekke. The pair laid down a scorching 148.5 to win. A few weeks later, they finished fourth in the NRHA Futurity.

2019 Horse Headliners

- December 2nd, 2019

Saluting a year’s worth of highlights and heroes


Winter


CELEBRATING THE CHALLENGE—Each year, the California Reining Horse Association puts on “the show of shows” on the West Coast, and last January’s issue was the one to celebrate “The Challenge”. It also was time to to honor the club’s list of 2018 Year-end Champions and Reserve Champions.